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Invasive Species Resources

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North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension. Going Native: Urban Landscaping for Wildlife with Native Plants.
North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension. Going Native: Urban Landscaping for Wildlife with Native Plants.
North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension. Going Native: Urban Landscaping for Wildlife with Native Plants.
North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension. Going Native: Urban Landscaping for Wildlife with Native Plants.
North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension. Going Native: Urban Landscaping for Wildlife with Native Plants.
North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension. Going Native: Urban Landscaping for Wildlife with Native Plants.
North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension. Going Native: Urban Landscaping for Wildlife with Native Plants.
North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension. Going Native: Urban Landscaping for Wildlife with Native Plants.
North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension. Going Native: Urban Landscaping for Wildlife with Native Plants.
North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension. Going Native: Urban Landscaping for Wildlife with Native Plants.
North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension. Going Native: Urban Landscaping for Wildlife with Native Plants.
South Dakota Department of Agriculture. Division of Resource Conservation and Forestry.
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant Industry Division. Plant Protection Section.
See also: Hot Pest Topics for more factsheets
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. North Carolina Forest Service.
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant Industry Division. Plant Protection Section.
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
See also: Resources for Agricultural Insects Pests for more factsheets
Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
In May of 2018, the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa confirmed the finding of the Haemaphysalis longicornis tick (otherwise known as the East Asian or Longhorned tick) in Virginia. It was previously unknown in the state, but since then has been detected in 24 counties, mostly in the western part of the state. "The tiny tick can appear on cows, horses and other livestock," said State Veterinarian Dr. Charles Broaddus. "In addition to being a nuisance, they also can be a health risk, especially to newborn or young animals." If you believe you have found the Longhorned tick, notify your local office of the Cooperative Extension Service.
North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension.
DOI. National Park Service.
The National Park Service (NPS) has finalized a long-term strategy to reduce the impacts and threats from invasive plants and to restore native plant communities and historic landscapes for 15 national park areas in D.C., Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia. The Invasive Plant Management Plan will guide park staff in standardizing and streamlining their treatment of non-native invasive plants. The plan will also help the NPS identify areas with the most urgent needs in order to address the most immediate threats to park resources. Each of the 15 area parks will develop an annual non-native invasive plant treatment strategy that is based on science, is cost effective, and poses the least amount of risk to people and park resources.