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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme. Pacific Invasives Learning Network.
This resource is to assist Pacific island invasive species practitioners in their battle against invasive species. It includes the Pacific Invasive Species Battler Series on common Pacific topical issues and an option to see what new resources have been added lately. You can also search for documents, case-studies, reports and other media by selecting the appropriate "Guidelines" theme or objective, or use the general search function by selecting tags related to the resources.

Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. Marine Invasions Research Lab. National Exotic Marine and Estuarine Species Information System (NEMESIS).

Chesapeake Bay Native Plant Center.

In 2003, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released the publication, Native Plants for Wildlife Habitat and Conservation Landscaping: Chesapeake Bay Watershed (PDF | 5.31 MB). Citizens, schools, non profit organizations, communities and government agencies used this resource to find the native plants that met their local conditions and interests in order to create landscapes to attract wildlife and reduce the amount of pollutants going into the Chesapeake Bay.

To reach more citizens and organizations, the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service envisioned an online version of the guide, the Native Plants Center Chesapeake Region. This expanded online guide includes a geo-locator feature to identify plants suited to your location, a searchable database of the native plants that meet your conditions, and (coming soon) an online network to interact with other Chesapeake Bay stewards.

University of Hawaii. Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources. Integrated Pest Management Program.
Provides general information on pest hosts, distribution, damage, biology, and management in the form of pest summaries.
Wageningen University & Research (Netherlands); Dutch Caribbean Nature Alliance.
DOC. NOAA. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory.
The present database targets nonindigenous aquatic species that are not considered to have been native to any part of the Great Lakes basin. GLANSIS functions as a Great Lakes specific node of the USGS NAS national database.
Midwest Invasive Plant Network.
Provides information on how to control many invasive plants common to the Midwestern U.S. Information was collected from both scientific literature and expert opinions and summarized by the Midwest Invasive Plant Network (MIPN), in partnership with the Mark Renz lab from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

IUCN. Species Survival Commission. Invasive Species Specialist Group.

Brock University (Canada).

The Niagara Region’s Aquatic and Riparian Invasive Species Control Database (created by Lyn A. Brown as part of a Master of Sustainability thesis at Brock University) provides a baseline for the 2017/18 state of aquatic and riparian invasive management activities in the Niagara Region of Ontario. An interactive GIS map uses the database information to show where those control efforts are occurring, and users can filter points on the map by invasive species, control type, control effectiveness, or organization.

DOC. NOAA. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory. Great Lakes Aquatic Nonindigenous Species Information System (GLANSIS).

Centre for Invasive Species Solutions; Atlas of Living Australia; Australian Government. Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment.

This collection houses Australia's most accurate and detailed listing of weeds within Australia and provides descriptions of their status in each Australian jurisdiction, as well as information about their physical and biological characteristics, diagnostic features, impacts, management strategies and methods, distribution and links to key resource and documents.