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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Mississippi River Basin Panel on Aquatic Nuisance Species.
Rapid response actions are often complex, costly, and controversial, and therefore advanced planning for rapid response prior to an introduction is crucial. The Mississippi River Basin Panel on AIS (MRBP) has developed this model rapid response plan and supplemental attachments to assist natural resources management agencies effectively plan and quickly implement rapid response actions. In addition to providing information on rapid response planning, the model plan includes a template that can be used by states in developing their own rapid response plans. See also: MRBP Documents for more resources.
Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.

USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.

Select the non-indigenous forest pest to view maps depicting state and county distribution. Produced by: USDA, FS, Forest Health Protection, and its partners.

USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Based on years of experience and the latest science, APHIS developed a list of 59 pests and diseases that could pose a significant risk to U.S. food and agriculture resources. The list is not meant to be all-encompassing, but rather focus on the most impactful pests and diseases. USDA's goal remains to keep the U.S. free of these foreign pests and diseases.

Cornell University (New York). New York State Agricultural Experiment Station.

DOC. NOAA. National Marine Fisheries Service. West Coast Region.

Northeast Aquatic Nuisance Species Panel.
Contains a compilation of known control methods for selected aquatic and wetland nuisance species.
Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee.
Delaware Invasive Species Council.
Be on the lookout for these up-and-coming invaders! They might not be in Delaware yet, but our best defense is early detection and rapid response!

Forest*A*Syst.

Most natural resource managers are familiar with the concept of Best Management Practices or BMPs uses in forestry as guidelines for recommended practices to protect water and soil resources during management operations such as timber harvests. As invasive species threaten more lands in the South, land managers can use BMPs for invasive species by developing a proactive approach to invasive species identification, documentation and control on their properties. To accomplish this, landowners must develop an awareness of the potential for the introduction and/or spread of invasive species as related to "normal use or management on their lands".

Forest*A*Syst is funded by USDA Forest Service and Natural Resource Conservation Service and developed by the Center for Invasive Species & Ecosystem Health at the University of Georgia.

BugwoodWiki.
Published by: USDA. Forest Service. Publication FHTET-2002-04.
Cornell University. Agriculture and Life Sciences.
This guide provides photographs and descriptions of biological control (or biocontrol) agents of insect, disease, and weed pests in North America. It is also a tutorial on the concept and practice of biological control and integrated pest management (IPM). Whether you are an educator, a commercial grower, a student, a researcher, a land manager, or an extension or regulatory agent, we hope you will find this information useful.

New Hampshire Department of Transportation.

To address mounting concerns over invasive plants and the role NHDOT activities play in the spread of these plants along roadsides, Best Management Practices (BMPs) have been developed with input from Maintenance Districts, the Roadside Development Section, the Bureau of Construction, and the NH Department of Agriculture. Implementation of these BMPs will help prevent the spread of invasive plants caused by maintenance and construction activities.

New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands.
DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service. Chesapeake Bay Field Office.

Native Plant Trust (Massachusetts).

Formerly the New England Wild Flower Society.