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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Oregon Department of Agriculture. Plant Division. Noxious Weed Control.

See also: Oregon Noxious Weed Profiles for more species

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.

Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology.
Note: Nesting Behavior

Oregon Invasive Species Council.

Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection.

Oregon Department of Agriculture.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

Potomac Highlands Cooperative Weed and Pest Management Area.

This annual event calls for volunteer to help pull garlic mustard in sites in Tennessee and West Virginia. Garlic Mustard has gained much attention in recent years for its ability to rapidly invade wooded habitats from disturbed areas. Garlic mustard is highly invasive and threatens the abundant wildflowers and diverse forest ecosystem of West Virginia, Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. The CWPMA serves Grant, Hardy, and Pendleton Counties in West Virginia and Highland County in Virginia.
Cornell University (New York). New York State Agricultural Experiment Station.
Cornell University. Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County. Horticulture Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Tree and Shrub Disease for more fact sheets.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Effective immediately, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is adding Eau Claire and Richland Counties in Wisconsin to the list of quarantine areas for gypsy moth (GM). The GM populations in these counties have reached the threshold to trigger the quarantine expansion. To prevent the further spread of GM, the attached Federal Order (PDF | 186 KB) establishes Eau Claire and Richland Counties in Wisconsin as quarantine areas. Effective immediately, all interstate movement of GM-regulated articles from Eau Claire and Richland Counties must be handled in accordance with the attached Federal Order. Wisconsin has established a parallel state quarantine.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Effective May 11, 2021, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets (NYS AGM) expanded the European cherry fruit fly (ECFF) quarantine to include all of Monroe County and Wayne County and a small portion of northwestern Ontario County, New York. With this expansion, the ECFF quarantine now includes all of Erie, Monroe, Niagara, Orleans, and Wayne Counties. This action is necessary to prevent the spread of ECFF to non-infested areas of the United States, while maintaining commercial cherry production and marketing within the state. The APHIS website reflects the expansion of this quarantine and contains a description of all the current federal fruit fly quarantine areas.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Effective immediately, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is removing 45,562.067 acres from the golden nematode (GN) regulated area in Suffolk County, New York and refining the global positioning system (GPS) points for the descriptions of the regulated area in the town of Oyster Bay in Nassau County, New York. APHIS is removing these areas based on survey results and other criteria in the "Canada and United States Guidelines on Surveillance and Phytosanitary Actions for the Potato Cyst Nematodes, Globodera rostochiensis and Globodera pallida”.

Since 2010, APHIS, working closely with the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets (NYS AGM), has removed 1,186,693.79 acres from the GN-regulated area in New York. APHIS and NYS AGM have an active control and mitigation program in place to prevent GN from spreading from the remaining 101,955.27 acres, including 5,945 GN-infested acres in eight New York counties. The specific GN-regulated areas are on the APHIS website.