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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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University of California. Agriculture and Natural Resources.
Provides information to both growers and home gardeners, in two distinct sub-sites -- to get the basics on the insect and the disease it can vector, how to inspect your trees, how to treat your tree if you find ACP, critical things to do to help contain the insect population and deal with Huanglongbing (HLB), as well as additional information more specific to California.
California Department of Food and Agriculture.

University of California - Riverside. Applied Biological Control Research.

Cornell University. Agriculture and Life Sciences.
This guide provides photographs and descriptions of biological control (or biocontrol) agents of insect, disease, and weed pests in North America. It is also a tutorial on the concept and practice of biological control and integrated pest management (IPM). Whether you are an educator, a commercial grower, a student, a researcher, a land manager, or an extension or regulatory agent, we hope you will find this information useful.

New Hampshire Department of Transportation.

To address mounting concerns over invasive plants and the role NHDOT activities play in the spread of these plants along roadsides, Best Management Practices (BMPs) have been developed with input from Maintenance Districts, the Roadside Development Section, the Bureau of Construction, and the NH Department of Agriculture. Implementation of these BMPs will help prevent the spread of invasive plants caused by maintenance and construction activities.

University of California. Agriculture and Natural Resources.

The University of California Statewide IPM Program (UC IPM) helps residents, growers, land managers, community leaders, and other professional pest managers prevent and solve pest problems with the least unintended impacts on people and their surroundings.

University of California - Riverside. Applied Biological Control Research.

Pennsylvania State University. School of Forest Resources.

California Sea Grant.
These materials are provided for educational purposes only. They are intended to provide a general overview of what is required for implementing tactics to eradicate and control aquatic invasive species (AIS). Although prevention is the best approach, it also is important to be prepared and respond quickly to new infestations and to reduce risks posed by existing infestations.
Nature Conservancy. iMapInvasives.
i is an invasive species reporting and data management tool that is on-line and map-based. The primary focus for iMapInvasives is to track invasive species locations and management efforts. iMapInvasives tools can be used by citizen scientists, land owners, natural resources managers, and others who are working to prevent, control, or manage invasive species.
See also: The iMapInvasives Network is comprised of organizations that host the iMapInvasives Network database in their respective state or province.

Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.

University of California. Cooperative Extension. Central Sierra.

University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension.

USDA. National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

NIFA partners with researchers and educators in the Land-Grant University System and the private sector to develop and implement new ways to address these complex pest management issues. NIFA provides funding to support extension IPM implementation and pesticide applicator safety programs in 50 states and six territories, the Minor Crop Pest Management Program (IR-4), four regional IPM centers, and numerous grants programs. Each of these investments contributes to the development of safe and effective IPM systems that increase farm profitability, reduce environmental and human health risks, and protect natural resources.

North Dakota State University.

Oregon State University. National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC).

Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.

The Department is required by the Pesticide Control Act of 1973, as amended in 1987, to educate all pesticide applicators about Integrated Pest Management (IPM) control methods as a part of license recertification requirements.

In addition, Pennsylvania is a signatory party to the Chesapeake Bay resolution which encourages the promotion of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) practices to citizens as a method to reduce toxics in the Bay.

Marin Agricultural Land Trust (California).

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry.

See also: Weeds - Quackgrass for more species resources