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Invasive Species Resources

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Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.
Michigan Technological University. Forest Resources and Environmental Sciences. Center for Exotic Species.

Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

The emerald ash borer is a half-inch long metallic green beetle with the scientific name Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. Larvae of this beetle feed under the bark of ash trees. Their feeding eventually girdles and kills branches and entire trees. Emerald ash borer was first identified in North America in southeastern Michigan in 2002.

Mississippi Forestry Commission.
Mississippi's ash trees are living on borrowed time. Every day the emerald ash borer is not detected in Mississippi is a minor victory. Infestations in surrounding Tennessee (detected 2010 near Nashville), Arkansas (detected in 2014 near Hot Springs) and north-central Louisiana (2015) continue to expand, despite quarantines in those areas. Most frighteningly, EAB was confirmed in Calhoun County, Alabama in October 2016. EAB now has Mississippi surrounded, and it is likely only a matter of time before it finds its way here. To prevent the spread of this and other non-native beetles, do not move firewood. Firewood is a vehicle for movement of tree-killing forest pests including EAB and Asian longhorned beetle. See Forest Health Articles for more pest alerts.

Nebraska Department of Agriculture. Plant Industry.

New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services.
See also: Exotic Species Program - Publications for more resources
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services.
See also: Exotic Species Program - Publications for more resources
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services.
See also: Exotic Species Program - Publications for more resources
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services.
See also: Exotic Species Program - Publications for more resources
Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council (Michigan).

New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.

Hawaii Invasive Species Council.
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services.
New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food. Division of Plant Industry.
See also: New Hampshire's Prohibited Invasive Plant Fact Sheets for additional invasive trees, shrubs, vines, and herbaceous plants
New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food. Division of Plant Industry.
See also: New Hampshire's Prohibited Invasive Plant Fact Sheets for additional invasive trees, shrubs, vines, and herbaceous plants
New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food. Division of Plant Industry.
See also: New Hampshire's Prohibited Invasive Plant Fact Sheets for additional invasive trees, shrubs, vines, and herbaceous plants
Pennsylvania State University. Pennsylvania Sea Grant.
See also: Aquatic Invasive Species: Resources for additional species information
New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food. Division of Plant Industry.
See also: New Hampshire's Prohibited Invasive Plant Fact Sheets for additional invasive trees, shrubs, vines, and herbaceous plants
New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food. Division of Plant Industry.
See also: New Hampshire's Prohibited Invasive Plant Fact Sheets for additional invasive trees, shrubs, vines, and herbaceous plants