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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Idaho State Department of Agriculture.

Florida Invasive Species Council.

New York Codes, Rules, and Regulations.

Florida Administrative Code.

Idaho Department of Agriculture.

Includes Statewide EDRR List, Statewide Control List, and Statewide Containment List

Idaho Department of Agriculture.

Includes Statewide EDRR List, Statewide Control List, and Statewide Containment List
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
A regulation was adopted in 2014 that prohibits or regulates the possession, transport, importation, sale, purchase and introduction of select invasive species. The purpose of this regulation is to help control invasive species, a form of biological pollution, by reducing the introduction of new and spread of existing populations.

Idaho State Department of Agriculture.

University of Florida. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension.

Florida is a national and global hot spot for non-native, invasive species. Because researchers and land managers in Florida have been dealing with invasive species for decades, there is an abundance of resources available to the public regarding invasive species. Sometimes, the volume of available information can be confusing. There are five different primary lists of non-native plant species that are referenced in Florida: 1. The Federal Noxious Weed List, 2. The Florida Noxious Weed List, 3. The Florida Prohibited Aquatic Plant List, 4. The Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC) Plant List, and 5. The UF/IFAS Assessment of Non-Native Plants. This document aims to inform the general public, land managers, researchers, local and state policy makers, and others who seek guidance in accessing regulatory and nonregulatory non-native plant lists in the state of Florida. This publication explains the origins of the lists, meaning of inclusion on a particular list, and ways to access each of the lists.

Michigan.gov.

Some invasive species are legally designated by the State of Michigan as either "prohibited" or "restricted." If a species is prohibited or restricted, it is unlawful to possess, introduce, import, sell or offer that species for sale as a live organism, except under certain circumstances.

Michigan.gov.

Invasive species on the watch list have been identified as posing an immediate or potential threat to Michigan's economy, environment or human health. These species either have never been confirmed in the wild in Michigan or have a limited known distribution. If you think you have found any of these species in Michigan, please report the occurrence via the methods given by clicking on an individual species name. View the watch list as a printable PDF (PDF | 268 KB).

Montana Department of Agriculture.

See also: Noxious Weeds for more resources

Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.

Includes lists of exotic controlled species, noncontrolled species, and prohibited species.

New York State Agricultural Experiment Station.
USDA. APHIS. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey (CAPS). National Agricultural Pest Information System (NAPIS).
Provides State pest detection contacts, recent state exotic pest news, links to state pest resources, and a list of state CAPS survey targets.
DOI. National Park Service; NatureServe. Explore Natural Communities.
Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.