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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Illinois Extension.

Okanagan Basin Water Board (Canada). Okanagan Water Wise.

Wageningen University & Research (Netherlands); Dutch Caribbean Nature Alliance.
Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development (Canada).
Caribbean Invasive Alien Species Network.
To date no studies have been undertaken on the costs and benefits of IAS management in the Caribbean. This may partly explain why there has been negligible funding to combat the onslaught of these exotic species in the region. As a result it was decided to provide individuals involved in the UNEP-GEF Project, "Mitigating the Threats of Invasive Alien Species in the Insular Caribbean" with training and an opportunity to undertake Cost-Benefit Analyses (CBAs) on some selected IAS. The CBAs undertaken and reported in this publication clearly demonstrates that the benefits of managing IAS outweigh the costs.
Lake George Association (New York).

Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.

Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (Canada).
Illinois Department of Agriculture. Bureau of Environmental Programs. Division of Natural Resources.
Native to Asia, the Emerald Ash Borer is an exotic beetle that was unknown in North America until June 2002 when it was discovered as the cause for the decline of many ash trees in southeast Michigan and neighboring Windsor, Ontario, Canada. It has since been found in several states from the east coast spanning across the midwest and in June 2006, we discovered that it had taken up residence in Illinois.
Delaware Department of Agriculture.
Emerald ash borer (EAB), a destructive insect from Asia that attacks and kills ash trees, has been confirmed at two new sites in Delaware: one near Middletown, New Castle County, and another near Seaford, Sussex County. Originally found in northern Delaware in 2016, the new detections create added urgency for homeowners and municipalities to determine if they have ash trees on their property and decide on possible management options. Current guidelines recommend the removal or treatment of ash trees if located within 15 miles of a known infestation. Because Delaware is geographically small and EAB can go undetected for years, residents are urged to educate themselves now and take action.
South Australia Primary Industries and Regions (Australia).
UNFAO. Animal Production and Health Division.
Bay of Plenty Regional Council (New Zealand).
Auckland Council (New Zealand).
Australian Government. Department of Agriculture and Water Resources.
Formerly the Invasive Plants and Animals Committee (IPAC).
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.