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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Clemson University Cooperative Extension. Home and Garden Information Center.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
Every day, Arkansas' homes, lawns and gardens are under siege by destructive insects, diseases, weeds and wildlife. How do you cope with them? How do you get rid of them? How do you prevent these problems in the first place? That's where the Pest Crew come in. Each of the experts has years of experience and are known across Arkansas for their pest-wise ways. We invite you to submit questions about your home, lawn and garden bug-a-boos to the Pest Crew.
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Hobby and Small Flock Poultry in Arkansas for more factsheets
Clemson University Cooperative Extension. Home and Garden Information Center.

USDA. FS. Southern Research Station. CompassLive.

White-nose syndrome has been spreading through U.S. bat populations since 2006 and has caused mass die-offs in various regions of the country. The syndrome is caused by Pd (Pseudogymnoascus destructans), a fungus that invades the skin of bats while they hibernate. USDA Forest Service wildlife biologists Roger Perry and Phillip Jordan conducted a study to calculate the survival rates of tricolored bats (Perimyotis subflavus) in the Ouachita Mountains of west-central Arkansas. The research helps satisfy the need for robust estimates of population data amid the WNS outbreak. The scientists chose to study the tricolored bat because it is common across North America and has suffered substantial declines due to WNS. The research highlights the importance of maintaining and protecting small hibernation sites as they may be critical to the conservation of the tricolored bat species.

Hilton Head Island Municipal Government (South Carolina).

Lake Champlain Land Trust.
Cornell University. Agriculture and Life Sciences.
This guide provides photographs and descriptions of biological control (or biocontrol) agents of insect, disease, and weed pests in North America. It is also a tutorial on the concept and practice of biological control and integrated pest management (IPM). Whether you are an educator, a commercial grower, a student, a researcher, a land manager, or an extension or regulatory agent, we hope you will find this information useful.
Cornell University Cooperative Extension. Department of Natural Resources.
See also: ForestConnect Fact Sheet Series for more factsheets.
Montana State University Extension.
DOI. NPS. Yellowstone National Park.
If you plan to use your own boat or angler float tube, you’ll need a permit and a free Yellowstone aquatic invasive species inspection. You can speed up the inspection process by arriving with a boat that is clean, drained, and dry. Watercraft that arrive dirty or with standing water will be subject to decontamination. Watercraft that cannot be properly decontaminated will be prohibited from launching.
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Extension Publications for more resources
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.
Catskills Regional Invasive Species Partnership.

DHS. Customs and Border Protection.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agriculture specialists have already intercepted a dozen significant and potentially destructive pests this year at various ports of entry in Florida as part of the agency's all-encompassing efforts to safeguard American agriculture.

Unknown pests pose a significant risk in agriculture due to a lack of knowledge in controlling the pests and the extent of damage they can cause to crops. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) entomologists recently classified eight pests discovered by CBP agriculture specialists in Florida as first-in-the-nation interceptions and another pest as a new species.

University of Florida. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.