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Invasive Species Resources

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New York State Department of Health.
Virginia Department of Health.
In November of 2017, a tick species previously unknown to the US called Haemaphysalis longicornis, or the Asian longhorned tick, was discovered both on a sheep and in a pasture in New Jersey. Since then, this new tick species has been found in eight additional states, including 17 counties and one city in Virginia.

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.

The Nature Conservancy's Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is celebrating its 20th anniversary by launching a new public awareness campaign focused on the simple steps Adirondack residents and visitors can take to prevent invasive species from spreading into the places they love. The "Keep Invasive Species Out" campaign is centered around a new website, KeepInvasiveSpeciesOut.com, that provides an overview of the problem and offers simple, preventive solutions for limiting the likelihood of unintentionally spreading an invasive. Tips are given for specific outdoor activities, including hiking, camping, boating, fishing, hunting, mountain biking, horseback riding, gardening/landscaping, and farming.

Cornell University. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

For the last seven decades, Cornell University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) has been leading the fight against nematodes—invasive, microscopic worms that can destroy seasons' worth of crops. However, researchers had been working in a facility that lacked the infrastructure to keep pace with their innovative work. On August 1, 2019, thanks to a $1.2 million grant from New York State and another $400,000 in federal funding, CALS cut the ribbon on the new Golden Nematode Quarantine Facility, located on the Cornell campus in Ithaca, NY. The facility is the only research program in North America with expertise in biology, resistance breeding and management of potato-cyst nematodes. At the lab, Cornell scientists work in tandem with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agriculture Research Service (ARS).

New Mexico Department of Agriculture.

The Director of the New Mexico Department of Agriculture has selected the following plant species to be targeted as noxious weeds for control or eradication pursuant to the Noxious Weed Management Act of 1998 (updated from 2009). This list does not include every plant species with the potential to negatively affect the state's environment or economy.
See also: Noxious Weed Information for more resources.
New Mexico Game & Fish.
New rules to combat the spread of aquatic invasive species in New Mexico went into effect July 11, 2017. Changes include:

  • Watercraft owners are required to stop at an inspection station whenever one is set up and in operation.
  • Mandatory inspection and, if necessary, decontamination is required of all out-of-state registered watercraft or watercraft re-entering the state of New Mexico.
  • All boaters are required to "pull the plug" and completely drain watercraft when transporting on a New Mexico roadway.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

Emerald ash borer was first confirmed in New York in June 2009 near Randolph, in western Cattaraugus County. The rapid spread of the beetle through North America is most likely due to the transport of infested firewood, ash nursery stock, unprocessed ash logs, and other ash products. In an effort to slow the continued spread of EAB, both Federal and New York State agencies have instituted quarantines of infested areas to regulate the transport of ash products.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.