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Invasive Species Resources

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Cornell University Cooperative Extension. Department of Natural Resources.
See also: ForestConnect Fact Sheet Series for more factsheets.
Montana State University Extension.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
DOI. NPS. Yellowstone National Park.
If you plan to use your own boat or angler float tube, you’ll need a permit and a free Yellowstone aquatic invasive species inspection. You can speed up the inspection process by arriving with a boat that is clean, drained, and dry. Watercraft that arrive dirty or with standing water will be subject to decontamination. Watercraft that cannot be properly decontaminated will be prohibited from launching.
Carolinas Beach Vitex Task Force.
Catskills Regional Invasive Species Partnership.
DOI. NPS. Great Smoky Mountains National Park.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
Illinois Department of Natural Resources.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Illinios-Indiana College Sea Grant Program.
To prepare students to be responsible decision-makers and future leaders, IISG has developed education programs that engage students in experiential practices to promote a sustainable society.

City and County of Butte-Silver Bow (Montana).

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.
The New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Agriculture and Markets (DAM) today confirmed that spotted lanternfly (SLF), an invasive pest from Asia, has been found in Albany and Yates counties. A single adult insect was discovered in a vehicle in the Capital District. In addition, a single adult insect was reported on a private Keuka Lake property in Penn Yan, Yates County. Anyone that suspects they have found SLF is encouraged to send a photo to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov. Please note the location of where the insect was found, egg masses, and/or infestation signs. DEC and DAM also encourage the public to inspect outdoor items such as vehicles, furniture, and firewood for egg masses. Anyone that visits the Pennsylvania or New Jersey Quarantine Areas should thoroughly inspect their vehicle, luggage and gear for SLF and egg masses before leaving and scrape off all egg masses.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.
New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.

University of Illinois Extension.

University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Woody Ornamentals for more fact sheets.