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Invasive Species Resources

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New York Invasive Species Awareness Week.

The mission of the New York Invasive Species Awareness Week (ISAW) is to promote knowledge and understanding of invasive species and the harm they can cause by engaging citizens in a wide range of activities across the state, and empowering them to take action to help stop the spread. This annual education campaign is comprised of various outreach initiatives and events led by partner organizations statewide. Activities include interpretive hikes, invasive plant removal, and restoration projects, displays, webinars, radio and television programming, and more.

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.
Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.

Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission.

See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for more action plans

Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission.
See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for more action plans
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology.
Note: Nesting Behavior

Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission.

The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) is urging anglers to report and dispose of any invasive Northern Snakehead fish that may be caught in the lower Susquehanna River. This advisory follows the documented movement of 21 Northern Snakeheads past the Conowingo Dam into the Conowingo Pool, a 14-mile-long section of the Susquehanna River located between the Conowingo Dam in Maryland and the Holtwood Dam in Pennsylvania. Anglers are reminded that possession, transport, and importation of a live snakehead is unlawful in both Pennsylvania and Maryland. Any of these invasive fish that are caught should be killed and disposed of properly or consumed. Anglers who suspect they have caught a snakehead are encouraged to NOT release it, and report it to the PFBC at (610) 847-2442 or by sending an email to tgrabowski@pa.gov. For more information on Northern Snakeheads in Pennsylvania, including an identification guide, visit the PFBC snakehead resource page.

Montana Department of Livestock. Animal Health Division.
University of Michigan. Museum of Zoology.
University of Michigan. Museum of Zoology.
University of Michigan. Museum of Zoology.
University of Michigan. Museum of Zoology.
University of Michigan. Museum of Zoology.
University of Michigan. Museum of Zoology.
University of Michigan. Museum of Zoology.
University of Michigan. Museum of Zoology.
University of Michigan. Museum of Zoology.
University of Michigan. Museum of Zoology.
University of Michigan. Museum of Zoology.