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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Aquatic Invaders in the Marketplace.

Find non-invasive plant alternatives that may be appropriate in your region.

Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission.

DOC. NOAA. National Marine Fisheries Service. West Coast Region.

University of Georgia. Bugwood Network.
DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service. Chesapeake Bay Field Office.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Provides comprehensive information on cogongrass in Georgia along with links to other southeastern state efforts on cogongrass. To date, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and Texas have on-going research, education and/or control programs that are supported by university, state and federal agency cooperators.
Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.

DOI. FWS. Fisheries and Habitat Conservation.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Aquatic Invasive Species Program supports a dedicated group of people who work closely with state invasive species coordinators, non-governmental groups, private landowners and many others in their day-to-day activities.

Michigan Department of Natural Resources.
Louisiana State University Agricultural Center. Research and Extension.
Georgia Invasive Species Task Force.
New York City Department of Health.

USDA. FS. Forest Health Protection.

The USDA program to manage Lymantria dispar is a partnership with the Forest Service, APHIS, and state partners, to suppress outbreaks in the generally infested area, eradicate isolated infestations in the uninfested area, and slow the spread along the advancing front.
See also: The Lymantria dispar Digest for a database containing information about gypsy moth defoliation and treatments at the national level. Treatments include those funded by the Suppression, Eradication, and Slow The Spread (STS) programs.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health; Megacopta Working Group.
Michigan Emerging Disease Issues.