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Invasive Species Resources

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Columbia University. Center for Environmental Research and Conservation.

Cornell University. College of Veterinary Medicine. Animal Health Diagnostic Center.

University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
Cornell University. New York State Integrated Pest Management Program.
See also: Invasive Species & Exotic Pests for more factsheets

Cornell University. New York State Integrated Pest Management Program.

See also: Invasive Species & Exotic Pests for more factsheets

Cornell University. New York State Integrated Pest Management Program.

See also: Invasive Species & Exotic Pests for more factsheets

Cornell University. New York State Integrated Pest Management Program.
See also: Invasive Species & Exotic Pests for more factsheets
Cornell University. New York State Integrated Pest Management Program.
See also: Invasive Species & Exotic Pests for more factsheets

Cornell University. New York State Integrated Pest Management Program.

See also: Invasive Species & Exotic Pests for more factsheets

Finger Lakes Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).
Paul Smith's College (New York). Adirondack Watershed Institute.
Paul Smith's College (New York). Adirondack Watershed Institute.
Paul Smith's College (New York). Adirondack Watershed Institute.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Entomology.
Officials with the Office of the State Entomologist in the University of Kentucky Entomology Department on May 22, 2009 announced two confirmed occurrences in Kentucky of emerald ash borer, an invasive insect pest of ash trees. These are the first findings of this destructive insect in the state.
DOI. National Park Service.
The National Park Service (NPS) has finalized a long-term strategy to reduce the impacts and threats from invasive plants and to restore native plant communities and historic landscapes for 15 national park areas in D.C., Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia. The Invasive Plant Management Plan will guide park staff in standardizing and streamlining their treatment of non-native invasive plants. The plan will also help the NPS identify areas with the most urgent needs in order to address the most immediate threats to park resources. Each of the 15 area parks will develop an annual non-native invasive plant treatment strategy that is based on science, is cost effective, and poses the least amount of risk to people and park resources.

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.

The Nature Conservancy's Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is celebrating its 20th anniversary by launching a new public awareness campaign focused on the simple steps Adirondack residents and visitors can take to prevent invasive species from spreading into the places they love. The "Keep Invasive Species Out" campaign is centered around a new website, KeepInvasiveSpeciesOut.com, that provides an overview of the problem and offers simple, preventive solutions for limiting the likelihood of unintentionally spreading an invasive. Tips are given for specific outdoor activities, including hiking, camping, boating, fishing, hunting, mountain biking, horseback riding, gardening/landscaping, and farming.

Cornell University. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

For the last seven decades, Cornell University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) has been leading the fight against nematodes—invasive, microscopic worms that can destroy seasons' worth of crops. However, researchers had been working in a facility that lacked the infrastructure to keep pace with their innovative work. On August 1, 2019, thanks to a $1.2 million grant from New York State and another $400,000 in federal funding, CALS cut the ribbon on the new Golden Nematode Quarantine Facility, located on the Cornell campus in Ithaca, NY. The facility is the only research program in North America with expertise in biology, resistance breeding and management of potato-cyst nematodes. At the lab, Cornell scientists work in tandem with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agriculture Research Service (ARS).

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.