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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

The Northern Snakehead (Channa argus), a fish native to China and Russia, has become a problem invasive species in several states, including Delaware. Anyone who catches a snakehead in Delaware is encouraged to kill it and notify the Division of Fish and Wildlife.

Delaware Invasive Species Council.
Be on the lookout for these up-and-coming invaders! They might not be in Delaware yet, but our best defense is early detection and rapid response!

Georgia Forestry Commission.

Cogongrass, Imperata cylindrica (L.), is considered the seventh worst weed in the world and listed as a federal noxious weed by USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service - Plant Protection and Quarantine. Cogongrass infestations are being found primarily in south Georgia but is capable of growing throughout the state. Join the cogongrass eradication team in Georgia and be a part of protecting our state's forest and wildlife habitat. Report a potential cogongrass sighting online or call your local GFC Forester.

Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Oklahoma Forestry Services.

Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources.

European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.

Cayman Islands Government. Department of Environment.

Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Wildlife Resources Division.

DNR and partners are working to eradicate a wild population of Argentine black and white tegus in Toombs and Tattnall counties in southeast Georgia. Growing up to 4 feet long and weighing 10 pounds or more, this lizard native to South America is an invasive species that threatens Georgia wildlife. Early detection, rapid response and public involvement are key to stopping tegus in this area. In Toombs and Tattnall, DNR's Wildlife Resources Division, the U.S. Geological Survey and Georgia Southern University are trapping tegus, tracking sightings and assessing the population. Tell DNR when you see a tegu in the wild, alive or dead. These reports help biologists document occurrences and respond effectively. Note the location, take a photo if possible and report the sighting:

University of Alaska - Anchorage. Alaska Center for Conservation Science.

New Zealand Ministry for Primary Industries.

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) is on high alert to stop the invasive brown marmorated stink bug from making a home in New Zealand. The bug is likely to start showing up in imported cargo from the northern hemisphere. Brown marmorated stink bug is a serious horticultural pest in the United States and is also starting to spread through Canada and parts of Europe. The Ministry for Primary Industries and industry groups have been working together to prepare for the increased risk.

Secretariat of the Pacific Community. Plant Protection Service.

See also: Pest Advisory Leaflets for more resources

Invasive Species Centre (Ontario).

Government of British Columbia. Ministry of Agriculture.

Three Asian Hornets (Vespa mandarinia) were found in the Nanaimo area on Vancouver Island in mid-August. The identification has been confirmed by Canadian and international experts. This is the first time this insect has been found in British Columbia. Please report suspected Asian giant hornet sightings to the Invasive Species Council of British Columbia.

North American Plant Protection Organization.