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Invasive Species Resources

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Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Consumer Protection Services.

If you suspect you have any of the invasive insects or disease on our list, take a picture and send it to us. Or, fill out the form and just let us know about it! Your personal information will be kept confidential, but we may need to contact you for further information.

DOC. NOAA. National Sea Grant Office.
Provides contact information for State Sea Grant Programs Websites. The Sea Grant Directors lead the 33 Sea Grant programs, the National Sea Grant Law Center, and the National Sea Grant Library based at top universities in every coastal and Great Lakes state, Puerto Rico, and Guam, working to bring the robust intellectual capacity in place at these universities to bear on important societal problems. They coordinate program activities, setting local, regional and national priorities, and work as part of a national network to help citizens and businesses understand, conserve and better utilize America’s coastal, ocean and Great Lakes resources.

University of Delaware. Cooperative Extension.

Delaware Department of Agriculture.

The spotted lanternfly – a destructive, invasive plant hopper – has been confirmed in New Castle County. Delaware is the second state to have found the insect which was first detected in the United States in 2014, in Berks County, PA. The spotted lanternfly has now spread to 13 Pennsylvania counties.This insect is a potential threat to several important agricultural crops including grapes, apples, peaches, and lumber. State plant health and forestry officials are providing information, fact sheets, photographs, and links to other resources at Delaware's Spotted Lanternfly resource page. Early detection is vital for the protection of Delaware businesses and agriculture.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.

DHHS. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Provides links and resources for State Health Departments, many of which have information about Zika virus and West Nile virus with specific state information.

DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service works in partnership with many organizations and individuals. Fish and wildlife conservation requires coordinated efforts by the states and the territories, as well as private landowners, tribes, and other countries besides the U.S. Provides a starting point for finding the state and territory agencies that manage fish and wildlife resources.

National Association of State Departments of Agriculture (NASDA).

The National Association of State Departments of Agriculture is comprised of the departments of agriculture in all fifty states and the territories of American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. NASDA Members are coregulators with the federal government on a host of responsibilities including animal health, farmland protection, food safety, grain regulation, pesticide registration, and more.

Noble Research Institute.

Publication NF-WF-10-01, 2nd Edition

Purdue University Extension. Weed Science.
City of Bowling Green (Kentucky).

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is announcing its plans for combatting the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) in New York, Massachusetts, and Ohio in 2020. "Just last year we declared eradication of ALB from Brooklyn and Queens in New York City, ending the city's 23-year-long battle with the beetle," said Osama El-Lissy, APHIS' Plant Protection and Quarantine Deputy Administrator. "This year, we've mapped out a sound strategy that will further our efforts to eliminate this pest from the remaining areas of this country where it still has a foothold."

Every year, APHIS evaluates and determines the most effective options to achieve ALB eradication. In 2020, the ALB program will focus on inspecting trees in quarantined areas in New York, Massachusetts, and Ohio, and removing infested trees at no cost to property owners. The program will not apply insecticide treatments this year. In addition, program officials will monitor for the beetle’s presence inside and around each area, respond to service calls, conduct training sessions for compliance agreement holders, and perform outreach.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

On October 10, 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) in coordination with the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, and New York City Department of Parks and Recreation announced that they have eliminated the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) from the New York City boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens. "I am proud to say that we have eradicated Asian longhorned beetle from Brooklyn and Queens," said Greg Ibach, USDA's Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs. "This officially marks the end of our 23-year long battle with this pest in New York City."

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

The United States Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has established a quarantine for European cherry fruit fly (ECFF) in New York. A portion of Niagara County is quarantined for the invasive fruit fly following the detection of 51 flies in 2017. APHIS and the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets (NYSDAM) are working collaboratively on this detection. The ECFF quarantine area encompasses approximately 92 square miles of Niagara County.
See also: Fruit Flies for additional information.

U.S. Department of Agriculture.
USDA Service Centers are designed to be a single location where customers can access the services provided by the Farm Service Agency, Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the Rural Development agencies. This locator site provides Agency offices serving your area (by state and county).