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Invasive Species Resources

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Regional Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Centers

The four Regional Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Centers serve as a hub for multi-state partnerships and communication networks, linking researchers, growers, extension educators, commodity organizations, environmental groups, pest control professionals, government agencies and others.

The four Regional IPM Centers serve as a hub for multi-state partnerships and communication networks, linking researchers, growers, extension educators, commodity organizations, environmental groups, pest control professionals, government agencies and others. The regions include: Northern IPM Center, Southern IPM Center, North Central IPM Center, and the Western IPM Center.

Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center.
Invasive species and climate change represent two of the five major global change threats to ecosystems. An emerging initiative of the Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center aims to develop management-relevant research to improve invasive species management in the face of climate change. Through working groups, information sharing and targeted research, this project addresses the information needs of invasive species managers in the context of climate change.

North Central Integrated Pest Management Center.

See also: Pest Alerts for more resources

North Central Integrated Pest Management Center.

See also: Pest Alerts for more resources
RiversEdge West.
Special Note: Formerly known as the Tamarisk Coalition.
Northeastern Integrated Pest Management Center.
What will the changes in climate mean for the distribution and occurrences of pests? What tools will help in addressing the needs? The Northeastern IPM Center is partnering with other leading organizations on initiatives related to climate change and pests.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

The Southeast Early Detection Network (SEEDN) app brings the power of Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System (EDDMapS) to your smartphone. Now you can submit invasive species observations directly with your smartphone from the field. These reports are uploaded to EDDMapS and e-mailed directly to local and state verifiers for review. SEEDN is more than just a smartphone app; it is an integrated invasive species reporting and outreach campaign for the Southeastern United States that includes the app and the EDDMapS website.

Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.
Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.
Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.
Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.
Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.
Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission. Aquatic Invasive Species Network.
Northeastern Integrated Pest Management Center. Stop BMSB.

USDA. Forest Service; Southern Regional Extension Forestry. Forest Health Program.

See also: Sirex Woodwasp for more resources

Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.

The invasive species education modules will help you become more comfortable with identifying these species in the field. Includes detailed information for terrestrial plants, aquatic plants, crustaceans, fish, insects, mollusks, and pathogens. Each module includes a short ten question quiz at the end to help you assess your newly acquired knowledge.

USDA. National Institute of Food and Agriculture; University of New Hampshire.
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found a dramatic decline of 14 wild bee species that are, among other things, important across the Northeast for the pollination of major local crops like apples, blueberries and cranberries.

“We know that wild bees are greatly at risk and not doing well worldwide,” said Sandra Rehan, assistant professor of biological sciences. “This status assessment of wild bees shines a light on the exact species in decline, beside the well-documented bumble bees. Because these species are major players in crop pollination, it raises concerns about compromising the production of key crops and the food supply in general.”

Lake Champlain Basin Program.