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Invasive Species Resources

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Conference of Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Governors and Premiers.

The Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Governors and Premiers have identified the "least wanted" aquatic invasive species (AIS) that present an imminent threat to the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River region. In 2013, the Governors and Premiers committed to take priority action on the transfer of these species to and within the region. Since then, the states and provinces have taken more than 50 separate actions to restrict these high-risk AIS, and the US federal government has similarly restricted four of the species. See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for more resources.

New York Invasive Species Awareness Week.

The mission of the New York Invasive Species Awareness Week (ISAW) is to promote knowledge and understanding of invasive species and the harm they can cause by engaging citizens in a wide range of activities across the state, and empowering them to take action to help stop the spread. This annual education campaign is comprised of various outreach initiatives and events led by partner organizations statewide. Activities include interpretive hikes, invasive plant removal, and restoration projects, displays, webinars, radio and television programming, and more.

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.
Catskills Regional Invasive Species Partnership.
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Agriculture.
Blue Accounting.
The species watch list identifies species that are likely to have a high or moderate ecological and/or socioeconomic impact if they established in or spread to new locations in the Great Lakes Basin. The watch list was compiled using several regional risk assessment sources and was developed as part of the Aquatic Invasive Species Interstate Surveillance Framework for the U.S. Waters of the Great Lakes.

Vermont Invasives.

An emerald ash borer (EAB) beetle was detected in a tree located in Londonderry, VT. The mapped area in Vermont (PDF | 1.25 MB) to which "Slow-the-Spread" recommendations apply now covers:

  • All of Londonderry, Windham, and Landgrove;
  • Most of Jamaica, Winhall, Peru, Weston, Andover and Grafton; and
  • Extends into Chester, Townshend, Stratton, Athens, Mount Tabor, and Wardsboro.

October means that non-flight season Recommendations to Slow the Spread of Emerald Ash Borer are now in effect when moving ash from the infested area. With the heating season underway, and firewood deliveries actively occurring, it’s important to remember that untreated ash firewood should never move out of infested areas. Be sure that your purchase or transportation of both log length and split firewood will not unnecessarily spread EAB. There’s a lot of spread to slow: While the infested area map shows that high-risk areas for EAB include many towns, visibly infested trees still remain rare in Vermont. You can help by following the "Slow-the-Spread" recommendations.

St. Lawrence - Eastern Lake Ontario Partnership For Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).

St. Lawrence - Eastern Lake Ontario Partnership For Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).

St. Lawrence - Eastern Lake Ontario Partnership For Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).

DOCNOAA. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory; DOIUSGS. Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.
DOCNOAA. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory; DOIUSGS. Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.

DOCNOAA. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory; DOIUSGS. Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.

DOC. NOAA. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory; DOI. USGS. Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.
DOC. NOAA. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory; DOI. USGS. Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.

Great Lakes Commission.

The Great Lakes Calendar features events from around the region that may be of interest to Great Lakes stakeholders, with a focus on professional conferences and events relevant to research, science, policy, and education.

Great Lakes Commission; Invasive Mussel Collaborative.
The Invasive Mussel Collaborative announced today that it has released a new strategy to reduce invasive mussels and their negative impacts. The Strategy to Advance Management of Invasive Zebra and Quagga Mussels is intended to drive investments, policy, and research around invasive mussels across the Great Lakes region and beyond. Since their initial discovery in 1989, zebra and quagga mussels have had dramatic impacts on the Great Lakes ecosystem and economy, including changes to the food web, degrading fish habitat, interfering with drinking water systems and damaging tourism and recreation economies. Today, these mussels continue to spread to new water bodies across the U.S. and Canada.
Finger Lakes Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.

See also: Manage an Infestation for more resources