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Invasive Species Resources

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Oregon Department of Agriculture. Plant Division. Noxious Weed Control.

See also: Oregon Noxious Weed Profiles for more species
Georgia Department of Agriculture.

Oregon Department of Agriculture.

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Office of Water Resources.
You can take actions to prevent the further spread of AIS. It is essential for boaters and recreational users of lakes and ponds to be vigilant!
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
Outreach and education is the most effective way to combat the spread of aquatic invasive species. The more people are made aware of the necessity of cleaning and drying boating and fishing equipment before using it in another waterbody, the less likely the aquatic invasive species will be spread to new waters. The following guidance/reminder sign templates are provided for you to download and use at private access points.
Ohio Department of Natural Resources.
New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.

See also: Forest Health Invaders for more fact sheets

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife.
The Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Program was established by the Oregon Legislature in an effort to keep Oregon’s lakes, rivers and streams free of destructive invasive species. The program requires owners of motorized and some non-motorized boats to purchase an Aquatic Invasive Species Permit to fund inspections of boats coming into Oregon to prevent the spread of these species into our waterways. All vehicles towing or carrying watercraft into Oregon must stop at a watercraft inspection station that is open to inspect for aquatic invasive species.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
Georgia Forestry Commission.
Cogongrass, Imperata cylindrica (L.), is considered the seventh worst weed in the world and listed as a federal noxious weed by USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service - Plant Protection and Quarantine. Cogongrass infestations are being found primarily in south Georgia but is capable of growing throughout the state. Join the cogongrass eradication team in Georgia and be a part of protecting our state's forest and wildlife habitat. Report a potential cogongrass sighting online or call your local GFC Forester.
Georgia Forestry Commission.

Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Division of Forestry.

Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Division of Forestry.

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

The New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Agriculture and Markets (DAM) today confirmed that spotted lanternfly (SLF), an invasive pest from Asia, has been found in Albany and Yates counties. A single adult insect was discovered in a vehicle in the Capital District. In addition, a single adult insect was reported on a private Keuka Lake property in Penn Yan, Yates County. Anyone that suspects they have found SLF is encouraged to send a photo to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov. Please note the location of where the insect was found, egg masses, and/or infestation signs. DEC and DAM also encourage the public to inspect outdoor items such as vehicles, furniture, and firewood for egg masses. Anyone that visits the Pennsylvania or New Jersey Quarantine Areas should thoroughly inspect their vehicle, luggage and gear for SLF and egg masses before leaving and scrape off all egg masses.

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

The New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Agriculture and Markets (DAM) today announced that although freezing temperatures will kill off adult spotted lanternflies (SLF), the public is urged to stay vigilant and report overwintering egg masses. In the fall, SLF will lay their eggs on any flat surface such as vehicles, firewood, outdoor furniture, stone or other items which can be inadvertently transported to new areas. If this insect becomes established in New York, it could impact New York's forests, agricultural and tourism industries. "To date, there has not been a documented spotted lanternfly infestation in New York, but I encourage the public to stay aware and be ready to report egg masses or other signs of this insect to help prevent infestations," said DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos.

Assistance from the public is crucial in limiting the movement of SLF and protecting New York's natural resources. DEC and DAM are urging the public to inspect outdoor items such as vehicles, outdoor furniture and camping equipment for egg masses or insects, and report any sightings by sending photos and location information to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov. Anyone that visits locations of SLF quarantines in other states should look for and remove insects and egg masses on items before leaving those areas. For more information, please visit DEC's spotted lanternfly webpage.

Ohio Department of Agriculture.