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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.
North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
Wyoming Game and Fish Department.
Please check this information before you transport your watercraft into Wyoming as this information will be updated regularly. This site includes detailed information and a map of inspection facilities including locations, dates of operation, and hours of operation. Any watercraft transported into Wyoming from March 1 through November 30 must undergo a mandatory inspection by an authorized inspector prior to launching in any water of the state. See also: AIS Inspection Location List.
Wyoming Game & Fish Department.
All watercraft using Wyoming waters are required to display an Aquatic Invasive Species decal. Costs for the decal are $10 for motorized watercraft registered in Wyoming, $30 for motorized watercraft registered in other states, $5 for non-motorized watercraft owned by Wyoming residents, and $15 for non-motorized watercraft owned by non-residents. Non-motorized inflatable watercraft 10 feet or less in length are exempt. Fees collected for the AIS decal will be used to fund the AIS program in Wyoming along with a General Fund Appropriation. These fees will pay for outreach and education, watercraft inspections, and monitoring to prevent the spread of AIS into Wyoming.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
Outreach and education is the most effective way to combat the spread of aquatic invasive species. The more people are made aware of the necessity of cleaning and drying boating and fishing equipment before using it in another waterbody, the less likely the aquatic invasive species will be spread to new waters. The following guidance/reminder sign templates are provided for you to download and use at private access points.
North Dakota Game and Fish Department.

Arkansas Department of Agriculture.

The Arkansas Department of Agriculture is pleased to announce the release of the newly created Arkansas Feral Hog Handbook, a guide to resources available in Arkansas to assist with feral hog control and eradication. The handbook includes contact information, websites, and brief explanations of the resources offered by state and federal agencies and other entities. "The Arkansas Feral Hog Handbook was made possible through a grant funded by the United States Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service. We appreciate their partnership and the information provided by other Feral Hog Eradication Task Force members to make the handbook a comprehensive educational resource for Arkansans," said Arkansas Secretary of Agriculture Wes Ward.

The handbooks are being distributed to the public at locations throughout the state with assistance from partner organizations, including the Arkansas Association of Conservation Districts, University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service, Arkansas Game and Fish, and Arkansas Farm Bureau. Copies of the handbook can be requested at lori.scott-nakai@arkansas.gov. An online version (2020; PDF | 4.48 MB) is also available.

Arkansas Department of Agriculture. Arkansas Forestry Commission (AFC).

The AR Forestry Division aims to maintain healthy, productive forest ecosystems by preventing, detecting, and suppressing damaging insects and diseases across all land ownerships.

Arkansas Department of Agriculture.

North Dakota Department of Agriculture.

Feral swine are an invasive species which cause extensive damage to crops, property, and the environment. They are also known to carry over 30 diseases and 37 parasites that can be transmitted to livestock, people, pets, and wildlife. When feral swine are sighted in North Dakota, the State Board of Animal Health should be notified immediately. Attempts will be made to identify whether the swine are truly feral or if they are escaped domestic swine which are private property. Individuals who encounter feral swine should not destroy them unless they encounter feral swine on their own property and there is a threat of harm or destruction of property. As soon as possible following destruction of the animal, but always within 24 hours, the individual must notify the State Board of Animal Health (BoAH) at 701-328-2655.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
North Dakota Department of Agriculture.

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

The New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Agriculture and Markets (DAM) today confirmed that spotted lanternfly (SLF), an invasive pest from Asia, has been found in Albany and Yates counties. A single adult insect was discovered in a vehicle in the Capital District. In addition, a single adult insect was reported on a private Keuka Lake property in Penn Yan, Yates County. Anyone that suspects they have found SLF is encouraged to send a photo to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov. Please note the location of where the insect was found, egg masses, and/or infestation signs. DEC and DAM also encourage the public to inspect outdoor items such as vehicles, furniture, and firewood for egg masses. Anyone that visits the Pennsylvania or New Jersey Quarantine Areas should thoroughly inspect their vehicle, luggage and gear for SLF and egg masses before leaving and scrape off all egg masses.

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

The New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Agriculture and Markets (DAM) today announced that although freezing temperatures will kill off adult spotted lanternflies (SLF), the public is urged to stay vigilant and report overwintering egg masses. In the fall, SLF will lay their eggs on any flat surface such as vehicles, firewood, outdoor furniture, stone or other items which can be inadvertently transported to new areas. If this insect becomes established in New York, it could impact New York's forests, agricultural and tourism industries. "To date, there has not been a documented spotted lanternfly infestation in New York, but I encourage the public to stay aware and be ready to report egg masses or other signs of this insect to help prevent infestations," said DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos.

Assistance from the public is crucial in limiting the movement of SLF and protecting New York's natural resources. DEC and DAM are urging the public to inspect outdoor items such as vehicles, outdoor furniture and camping equipment for egg masses or insects, and report any sightings by sending photos and location information to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov. Anyone that visits locations of SLF quarantines in other states should look for and remove insects and egg masses on items before leaving those areas. For more information, please visit DEC's spotted lanternfly webpage.

Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources.

Wyoming State Forestry Division.
Emerald ash borer (EAB) was confirmed in Boulder County, Colorado in September 2013. This marks the first time EAB has been detected in Colorado as well as the first detection of EAB in any western state. EAB has not been detected in Wyoming. See Forest Health Management for related EAB information.

New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.

Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant and Pest Services.