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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Vermont. Entomological Research Laboratory.
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Field Crop Diseases in Arkansas for more factsheets
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
Every day, Arkansas' homes, lawns and gardens are under siege by destructive insects, diseases, weeds and wildlife. How do you cope with them? How do you get rid of them? How do you prevent these problems in the first place? That's where the Pest Crew come in. Each of the experts has years of experience and are known across Arkansas for their pest-wise ways. We invite you to submit questions about your home, lawn and garden bug-a-boos to the Pest Crew.
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Hobby and Small Flock Poultry in Arkansas for more factsheets
Clemson University Cooperative Extension. Home and Garden Information Center.

Hilton Head Island Municipal Government (South Carolina).

Lake Champlain Land Trust.
Cornell University. Agriculture and Life Sciences.
This guide provides photographs and descriptions of biological control (or biocontrol) agents of insect, disease, and weed pests in North America. It is also a tutorial on the concept and practice of biological control and integrated pest management (IPM). Whether you are an educator, a commercial grower, a student, a researcher, a land manager, or an extension or regulatory agent, we hope you will find this information useful.
Cornell University Cooperative Extension. Department of Natural Resources.
See also: ForestConnect Fact Sheet Series for more factsheets.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Extension Publications for more resources
University of Vermont. Forest Pathology.

North Dakota Department of Agriculture.

Feral swine are an invasive species which cause extensive damage to crops, property, and the environment. They are also known to carry over 30 diseases and 37 parasites that can be transmitted to livestock, people, pets, and wildlife. When feral swine are sighted in North Dakota, the State Board of Animal Health should be notified immediately. Attempts will be made to identify whether the swine are truly feral or if they are escaped domestic swine which are private property. Individuals who encounter feral swine should not destroy them unless they encounter feral swine on their own property and there is a threat of harm or destruction of property. As soon as possible following destruction of the animal, but always within 24 hours, the individual must notify the State Board of Animal Health (BoAH) at 701-328-2655.

Catskills Regional Invasive Species Partnership.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
South Carolina Native Plant Society.
Fig Buttercup (Ficaria verna, formerly Ranunculus ficaria) is an early-blooming perennial with origins in Europe and northern Africa. It is also called Lesser Celandine, and it is sometimes confused with Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris). More recently, its behavior has transitioned or is in the process of transitioning to that of an aggressive invasive species that threatens bottomlands throughout its adopted range. Even after its invasiveness was recognized, many people did not anticipate that it would behave invasively in the South, as it has begun to do. Be a Citizen Scientist— We are asking you to help us scout areas near you where it is likely to be found, so that emerging infestations can be documented, treated and monitored.
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. Freshwater Fisheries Section.