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Invasive Species Resources

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Cornell University. New York State Integrated Pest Management Program.

See also: Invasive Species & Exotic Pests for more factsheets

Cornell University. New York State Integrated Pest Management Program.
See also: Invasive Species & Exotic Pests for more factsheets
Cornell University. New York State Integrated Pest Management Program.
See also: Invasive Species & Exotic Pests for more factsheets

Cornell University. New York State Integrated Pest Management Program.

See also: Invasive Species & Exotic Pests for more factsheets

Finger Lakes Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).
Lake George Association (New York).
Paul Smith's College (New York). Adirondack Watershed Institute.
Paul Smith's College (New York). Adirondack Watershed Institute.
Paul Smith's College (New York). Adirondack Watershed Institute.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
A regulation was adopted in 2014 that prohibits or regulates the possession, transport, importation, sale, purchase and introduction of select invasive species. The purpose of this regulation is to help control invasive species, a form of biological pollution, by reducing the introduction of new and spread of existing populations.
Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space.
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.
Tennessee Department of Agriculture.
The Tennessee Department of Agriculture, United States Department of Agriculture – Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services, Tennessee Department of Health, and University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture (UTIA) has announced the detection of the invasive Asian longhorned tick in Tennessee. The Asian longhorned tick has now spread to 11 states. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that there is no evidence that the tick has transmitted pathogens to humans or animals in the U.S. Two Asian longhorned ticks were recently found on a dog in Union County, and five were found on a cow in Roane County. In the U.S., the tick has been reported on 17 different mammal species.
Barataria Terrebonne National Estuary Program.
Caddo Lake Institute. Great Raft Invasives Program.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Entomology.
Officials with the Office of the State Entomologist in the University of Kentucky Entomology Department on May 22, 2009 announced two confirmed occurrences in Kentucky of emerald ash borer, an invasive insect pest of ash trees. These are the first findings of this destructive insect in the state.