An official website of the United States government

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted  — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

You are here Back to top

Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 1 to 20 of 105

Search Help
Tennessee Department of Agriculture.
Three Tennessee counties have been quarantined for Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) after detection of the forest-devastating insect, bringing the total number of Tennessee counties under a state and federal EAB quarantine to 62. Cheatham, Giles, and Maury counties have been added to the list of areas restricted for the movement of firewood, ash nursery stock, ash timber, and other material that can spread EAB. The tree-killing beetle was recently found in these three counties through the United States Department of Agriculture’s EAB detection program.
North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.
North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
Nevada Department of Wildlife.
The Nevada aquatic invasive species (AIS) decal requirement became effective Jan 1, 2013 through approval from the Nevada State Legislature in 2011. The AIS decal requirement was established to prevent the spread of harmful aquatic species threatening Nevada's waterways.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

The goal of this project is to raise awareness about invasive species and to turn that awareness into action to prevent and to manage current and future invasions. The project consists of lesson plans and corresponding hands-on items designed to teach the story about invasive species. Each lesson plan has been aligned with Next Generation Science Standards, Common Core Standards, and Maryland Environmental Literacy Standards. Lesson plans in each module include activities for Grades 3-12.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
Outreach and education is the most effective way to combat the spread of aquatic invasive species. The more people are made aware of the necessity of cleaning and drying boating and fishing equipment before using it in another waterbody, the less likely the aquatic invasive species will be spread to new waters. The following guidance/reminder sign templates are provided for you to download and use at private access points.
Nevada Department of Wildlife.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.

See also: Forest Health Invaders for more fact sheets

University of Maryland. Cooperative Extension. Home and Garden Information Center.
Have a plant or pest question? Questions from Maryland and the District of Columbia are answered by Home and Garden Information Center’s Certified Professional Horticulturists. If you are located outside of these areas, you will be asked to enter your state and county. Your question will be forwarded to the appropriate extension expert.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

North Dakota Department of Agriculture.

Feral swine are an invasive species which cause extensive damage to crops, property, and the environment. They are also known to carry over 30 diseases and 37 parasites that can be transmitted to livestock, people, pets, and wildlife. When feral swine are sighted in North Dakota, the State Board of Animal Health should be notified immediately. Attempts will be made to identify whether the swine are truly feral or if they are escaped domestic swine which are private property. Individuals who encounter feral swine should not destroy them unless they encounter feral swine on their own property and there is a threat of harm or destruction of property. As soon as possible following destruction of the animal, but always within 24 hours, the individual must notify the State Board of Animal Health (BoAH) at 701-328-2655.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.
The New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Agriculture and Markets (DAM) today confirmed that spotted lanternfly (SLF), an invasive pest from Asia, has been found in Albany and Yates counties. A single adult insect was discovered in a vehicle in the Capital District. In addition, a single adult insect was reported on a private Keuka Lake property in Penn Yan, Yates County. Anyone that suspects they have found SLF is encouraged to send a photo to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov. Please note the location of where the insect was found, egg masses, and/or infestation signs. DEC and DAM also encourage the public to inspect outdoor items such as vehicles, furniture, and firewood for egg masses. Anyone that visits the Pennsylvania or New Jersey Quarantine Areas should thoroughly inspect their vehicle, luggage and gear for SLF and egg masses before leaving and scrape off all egg masses.
Maryland Department of Agriculture.
A Notice of Final Action for the Maryland Invasive Plant Regulations was published in the Maryland Register on Friday, February 3. These regulations went into effect February 13. The updated regulations add a total of four new species to the Tier 1 and Tier 2 lists established by the original invasive plant regulations (April 2016). Weed risk assessments are ongoing, and additional plant species will be added to the lists through the regulatory process as they are completed and approved. These science-based assessments are the foundation for decisions regarding a plant’s invasive status in the state. Full assessment reports are available on the Maryland Invasive Plants Prevention and Control website.
New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.
Maryland Department of Agriculture.