An official website of the United States government

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted  — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

You are here Back to top

Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 321 to 340 of 343

Search Help
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

The United States Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has established a quarantine for European cherry fruit fly (ECFF) in New York. A portion of Niagara County is quarantined for the invasive fruit fly following the detection of 51 flies in 2017. APHIS and the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets (NYSDAM) are working collaboratively on this detection. The ECFF quarantine area encompasses approximately 92 square miles of Niagara County.
See also: Fruit Flies for additional information.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.
Maryland Department of Agriculture.
Thousand cankers disease (TCD) is a disease complex native to the western United States and primarily affects black walnut, Juglans nigra. This disease is the result of the combined activity of a fungus, Geosmithia morbida, and the walnut twig beetle WTB), Pityophthorus juglandis. On January 12, 2015, the the Maryland Secretary of Agriculture issued a quarantine order (PDF | 91 KB) to minimize the risk of moving infested material out of the limited action area in Cecil County, and to provide confidence in Maryland walnut products moving into neighboring states from non quarantined areas.

Lake Champlain Basin Program.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

Las Vegas Wash Coordination Committee.
University of Conecticut. Connecticut Sea Grant.
DOI. NPS. Mammoth Cave National Park.
Bats are dying. Please help us protect them. A disease called white-nose syndrome (WNS) is spreading through the eastern United States, killing bat populations. White-nose syndrome is considered to be present in the Mammoth Cave System. It is believed that humans may contribute to the spread of white-nose syndrome by visiting contaminated caves or mines and then wearing the same clothing or carrying the same objects to unaffected caves or mines, transporting spores from one place to the other. You can help us save bats by following a few simple guidelines.
Tennessee Bat Working Group.
White-nose Syndrome is a mysterious disease that is killing bats across the northeast United States. Many research projects are underway to help in the fight against WNS, from researching fungicides to modeling the spread and affects of the syndrome. If you would like to help there are many ways in which you can:
  • Report any unusual bat activity (bats flying in the daytime) or unexplained bat deaths to your regional TWRA office. Or check out the Report a Bat Link on this website.
  • Donate to a number of funds collecting money for WNS research (see National Speleological Society and Bat Conservation International pages below).
  • Adhere to state and federal cave closure advisories.
  • Encourage state and federal agencies to assist in WNS research and monitoring activities.
Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
Kentucky Department of Fish & Wildlife.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculturel, Food, and Environment. Department of Forestry and Natural Resources.

University of Kentucky. Kentucky Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
The more people we have looking for invasive pests, the better our chances are to prevent establishment of the pest in Kentucky. If you see a pest (insect, invertebrate, plant disease) that could be one of the exotics featured on this website, let us know!

Google. YouTube; New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

Google. YouTube; New York Sea Grant.
Google. YouTube; University of Tennessee. Institute of Agriculture.
Google. YouTube; Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Fisheries.