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Invasive Species Resources

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Maine Department of Environmental Protection.
In 2008, the purchase of a new sticker for owners of Maine-registered watercraft was automatically combined with the watercraft registration fee. The sticker, which now reads "Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers -- Preserve Maine Waters" and is physically attached to the Maine watercraft registration, has been required since 2002 for all motorized watercraft on inland waters. Owners of non-Maine registered boats will continue to be required to purchase and affix a separate nonresident sticker. 
New York Invasive Species Awareness Week.
The mission of the New York Invasive Species Awareness Week (ISAW) is to promote knowledge and understanding of invasive species and the harm they can cause by engaging citizens in a wide range of activities across the state, and empowering them to take action to help stop the spread. This annual education campaign is comprised of various outreach initiatives and events led by partner organizations statewide. Activities include interpretive hikes, invasive plant removal, and restoration projects, displays, webinars, radio and television programming, and more.
University of Nevada - Reno. Cooperative Extension.
See also: Agriculture Publications for more fact sheets
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.
Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.
Maine Department of Environmental Protection.
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.
Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology.
Note: Nesting Behavior
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.
Cornell University (New York). New York State Agricultural Experiment Station.
Cornell University. Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County. Horticulture Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Tree and Shrub Disease for more fact sheets.
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Sea Grant.
USDA. FS. Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit.
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Sea Grant.
AIS-HACCP is a self-inspection system for reducing the risk of spreading aquatic invasive species through aquaculture, hatchery, scientific, natural resource, and baitfish harvesting activities. This adaptable way to protect waterways from unwanted species was derived from HACCP methods required for the seafood industry and builds on Sea Grant’s success in assisting industry compliance.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.
An affirmation card reminds boaters and nonresident anglers of Minnesota’s aquatic invasive species laws. Watercraft owners and nonresident anglers must read and sign the affirmation during their regular license renewal, then keep it in their possession with their license. The affirmation, enacted by the Minnesota Legislature, is another positive step in the state’s proactive efforts to keep 95% of Minnesota lakes off the infested waters list.
Wyoming Game and Fish Department.
Please check this information before you transport your watercraft into Wyoming as this information will be updated regularly. This site includes detailed information and a map of inspection facilities including locations, dates of operation, and hours of operation. Any watercraft transported into Wyoming from March 1 through November 30 must undergo a mandatory inspection by an authorized inspector prior to launching in any water of the state. See also: AIS Inspection Location List.
Wyoming Game & Fish Department.
All watercraft using Wyoming waters are required to display an Aquatic Invasive Species decal. Costs for the decal are $10 for motorized watercraft registered in Wyoming, $30 for motorized watercraft registered in other states, $5 for non-motorized watercraft owned by Wyoming residents, and $15 for non-motorized watercraft owned by non-residents. Non-motorized inflatable watercraft 10 feet or less in length are exempt. Fees collected for the AIS decal will be used to fund the AIS program in Wyoming along with a General Fund Appropriation. These fees will pay for outreach and education, watercraft inspections, and monitoring to prevent the spread of AIS into Wyoming.
Nevada Department of Wildlife.
The Nevada aquatic invasive species (AIS) decal requirement became effective Jan 1, 2013 through approval from the Nevada State Legislature in 2011. The AIS decal requirement was established to prevent the spread of harmful aquatic species threatening Nevada's waterways.