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Invasive Species Resources

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New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

The New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Agriculture and Markets (DAM) today confirmed that spotted lanternfly (SLF), an invasive pest from Asia, has been found in Albany and Yates counties. A single adult insect was discovered in a vehicle in the Capital District. In addition, a single adult insect was reported on a private Keuka Lake property in Penn Yan, Yates County. Anyone that suspects they have found SLF is encouraged to send a photo to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov. Please note the location of where the insect was found, egg masses, and/or infestation signs. DEC and DAM also encourage the public to inspect outdoor items such as vehicles, furniture, and firewood for egg masses. Anyone that visits the Pennsylvania or New Jersey Quarantine Areas should thoroughly inspect their vehicle, luggage and gear for SLF and egg masses before leaving and scrape off all egg masses.

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

The New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Agriculture and Markets (DAM) today announced that although freezing temperatures will kill off adult spotted lanternflies (SLF), the public is urged to stay vigilant and report overwintering egg masses. In the fall, SLF will lay their eggs on any flat surface such as vehicles, firewood, outdoor furniture, stone or other items which can be inadvertently transported to new areas. If this insect becomes established in New York, it could impact New York's forests, agricultural and tourism industries. "To date, there has not been a documented spotted lanternfly infestation in New York, but I encourage the public to stay aware and be ready to report egg masses or other signs of this insect to help prevent infestations," said DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos.

Assistance from the public is crucial in limiting the movement of SLF and protecting New York's natural resources. DEC and DAM are urging the public to inspect outdoor items such as vehicles, outdoor furniture and camping equipment for egg masses or insects, and report any sightings by sending photos and location information to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov. Anyone that visits locations of SLF quarantines in other states should look for and remove insects and egg masses on items before leaving those areas. For more information, please visit DEC's spotted lanternfly webpage.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry. Maine Forest Service.

University of Illinois Extension.

University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Woody Ornamentals for more fact sheets.
Lake George Association (New York).
Illinois Department of Agriculture. Bureau of Environmental Programs. Division of Natural Resources.
Native to Asia, the Emerald Ash Borer is an exotic beetle that was unknown in North America until June 2002 when it was discovered as the cause for the decline of many ash trees in southeast Michigan and neighboring Windsor, Ontario, Canada. It has since been found in several states from the east coast spanning across the midwest and in June 2006, we discovered that it had taken up residence in Illinois.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.

New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.
See also: Insect Factsheets for more resources
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. 
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.
See also: Insect Fact Sheets for more resources
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.
See also: Insect Fact Sheets for more resources
DOI. NPS. Yellowstone National Park.
New York Codes, Rules, and Regulations.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation.
"Forest Health Highlights" (FHHs) are an annual summary of forest insect and disease conditions in Montana. They summarize key findings from the Montana Forest Insect and Disease Conditions and Program Highlights report along with project updates specific to the Montana DNRC Forest Pest Management program.
Kentucky Department for Natural Resources. Division of Forestry.