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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Georgia Department of Agriculture.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

These best management practices for water accesses have been developed by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources in an effort to reduce the spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS). By following these guidelines, providers of public and private boat access facilities can create visible and functional designated areas where boaters can clean and drain boating equipment and conduct other AIS prevention activities.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Hilton Head Island Municipal Government (South Carolina).

New Hampshire Department of Transportation.

To address mounting concerns over invasive plants and the role NHDOT activities play in the spread of these plants along roadsides, Best Management Practices (BMPs) have been developed with input from Maintenance Districts, the Roadside Development Section, the Bureau of Construction, and the NH Department of Agriculture. Implementation of these BMPs will help prevent the spread of invasive plants caused by maintenance and construction activities.

Mississippi Department of Agriculture.
New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands.
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Exotic Species Program.

South Carolina Forestry Commission.

The emerald ash borer, a beetle pest that has devastated ash trees throughout the eastern United States, was officially detected in Greenville, Oconee and Spartanburg counties in August 2017. According to a Clemson University press release, the beetles were found Aug. 3 during a routine check of Emerald Ash Borer traps and confirmed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In response to the discovery of EAB in the Upstate, the State Crop Pest Commission likely will establish a quarantine area involving at least the three affected counties; it is also possible the quarantine could be expanded to additional counties or even the entire state.

North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant Industry Division. Plant Protection Section.
South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. Aquatic Nuisance Species Program.

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

Mississippi Department of Marine Resources.

North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission.

The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has unveiled a new online reporting tool for people to report any sightings of feral swine or their damage to the agency. Feral swine, also called wild boar and feral hogs, are an invasive species that cause significant damage to plant communities and wildlife habitat, prey on native wildlife, compete with native species for limited food and clean water resources and potentially spread diseases that pose substantial risk to livestock, wildlife, humans and pets. Commission biologists, along with other members of the N.C. Feral Swine Task Force, are seeking information from the public to better understand the distribution and abundance of feral swine across the state, and to estimate type and extent of damages they are causing, including damage to agricultural crops, timber, wildlife habitats, landscaping and others.

Reported sightings will help members of the task force determine priority areas where they can focus management efforts. Education and outreach events, technical assistance staff, loaner traps, and other control measures will be focused in areas of greatest need. For more information on feral swine in North Carolina, visit the Commission’s feral swine web page.

Mississippi Forestry Commission.

"Help Stop the Pop", MFC's popcorn tree control program, aims to track popcorn trees, assist municipalities with popcorn tree control, and educate landowners about proper tree removal. Chinese tallow trees, also known as the popcorn tree, are deceptive. They look attractive and ornamental, but they are actually highly invasive and will quickly damage the native ecosystem wherever they are planted. By reporting the location of these trees, you can help the Mississippi Forestry Commission (MFC) get a full picture of Mississippi's popcorn tree problem, which is the first step to combating the spread of this invasive species. Help the MFC stop the spread of this invasive species. Report sightings to HelpStopThePop.com. More Information visit the MFC's Chinese Tallow Tree information page.

North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant Industry Division. Plant Protection Section.
South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. Aquatic Nuisance Species Program.
The S.C. Department of Natural Resources in conjunction with the Aquatic Plant Management Council is responsible for the management of nuisance aquatic vegetation in public waters. Each year an Aquatic Plant Management Plan is developed which identifies aquatic weed problem areas, describes management objectives, prescribes management strategies, and determines funding needs and sources.

New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands.

As of Jul 2011, New Hampshire has banned the importation of untreated firewood without a commercial or home heating compliance agreement. Firewood is a major source of damaging insects and diseases. This ban will help protect the health on New Hampshire's forests.