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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.

Potomac Highlands Cooperative Weed and Pest Management Area.

This annual event calls for volunteer to help pull garlic mustard in sites in Tennessee and West Virginia. Garlic Mustard has gained much attention in recent years for its ability to rapidly invade wooded habitats from disturbed areas. Garlic mustard is highly invasive and threatens the abundant wildflowers and diverse forest ecosystem of West Virginia, Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. The CWPMA serves Grant, Hardy, and Pendleton Counties in West Virginia and Highland County in Virginia.
Catskills Regional Invasive Species Partnership.
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Agriculture.

Vermont Invasives.

An emerald ash borer (EAB) beetle was detected in a tree located in Londonderry, VT. The mapped area in Vermont (PDF | 1.25 MB) to which "Slow-the-Spread" recommendations apply now covers:

  • All of Londonderry, Windham, and Landgrove;
  • Most of Jamaica, Winhall, Peru, Weston, Andover and Grafton; and
  • Extends into Chester, Townshend, Stratton, Athens, Mount Tabor, and Wardsboro.

October means that non-flight season Recommendations to Slow the Spread of Emerald Ash Borer are now in effect when moving ash from the infested area. With the heating season underway, and firewood deliveries actively occurring, it’s important to remember that untreated ash firewood should never move out of infested areas. Be sure that your purchase or transportation of both log length and split firewood will not unnecessarily spread EAB. There’s a lot of spread to slow: While the infested area map shows that high-risk areas for EAB include many towns, visibly infested trees still remain rare in Vermont. You can help by following the "Slow-the-Spread" recommendations.

Cornell University. New York Invasive Species Research Institute.

A cozy campfire for summer days, a warm fireplace for winter evenings– the use of firewood is an "established cultural norm". However, moving firewood from place to place can have devastating consequences, as it can spread forest pests that decimate forests to collectively cost an estimated $4.2 – $14.4 billion per year. In order to better address the problem of people moving firewood and vectoring forest pests, Solano and colleagues examined trends and gaps in the existing literature on firewood and human-mediated forest pest movement in North America. The existing literature demonstrates the risk of firewood movement, but fails to address the level of awareness the public has on such risks, or the level of effectiveness of firewood regulations to prevent forest pest spread.

Lake Champlain Basin Program.

University of California - Berkeley. Cooperative Extension; USDA. Forest Service.
Finger Lakes Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).

Western New York Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management.

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.

See also: Best Management Practices for more resources

St. Lawrence - Eastern Lake Ontario Partnership For Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.

Lake Tahoe Basin Weed Management Area.

Chesapeake Bay Program.

New York Invasive Species Awareness Week.

The mission of the New York Invasive Species Awareness Week (ISAW) is to promote knowledge and understanding of invasive species and the harm they can cause by engaging citizens in a wide range of activities across the state, and empowering them to take action to help stop the spread. This annual education campaign is comprised of various outreach initiatives and events led by partner organizations statewide. Activities include interpretive hikes, invasive plant removal, and restoration projects, displays, webinars, radio and television programming, and more.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.