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Invasive Species Resources

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University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension.
Utah Department of Agriculture and Food.

New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands.

As of Jul 2011, New Hampshire has banned the importation of untreated firewood without a commercial or home heating compliance agreement. Firewood is a major source of damaging insects and diseases. This ban will help protect the health on New Hampshire's forests.

University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension.
As of February 2015, brown marmorated stinkbug (BMSB) has been confirmed in 20 New Hampshire towns/cities. With the exception of a confirmation on nursery stock (shipped several months earlier from Long Island, NY), no specimens have yet been found on any crop. The vast majority of specimens have been found on or in buildings. We need your help. We want to find out where BMSB occurs in New Hampshire. Let us know if you see this species in or on your New Hampshire home. Verbal descriptions are not much use, but clear, close-up photos or specimens are helpful. We want to track this insect in NH and how it builds in numbers.
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed the presence of virulent Newcastle disease in a small flock of backyard exhibition chickens in Utah County, Utah. This is the first case of virulent Newcastle disease in Utah. This case is believed to be connected to the current outbreak of virulent Newcastle disease in California, as three of the birds at the premises were recently moved to Utah from Los Angeles County, California. Since May 2018, 299 cases of Newcastle disease have been confirmed in Southern California, primarily in backyard exhibition birds.

Virulent Newcastle disease is not a food safety concern. No human cases of Newcastle disease have ever occurred from eating poultry products.
Utah State University Extension.
Utah State University Extension; Utah Plant Pest Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Tree Fruit Insects Fact Sheets for more species
Utah State University Extension; Utah Plant Pest Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Landscape Ornamental Insects for more fact sheets
Utah State University Extension; Utah Plant Pest Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Tree Fruit Insects Fact Sheets for more species
Utah State University Extension; Utah Plant Pest Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Landscape Ornamental Insects Fact Sheets for more species
Utah State University Extension.
See also: Forage and Field Insects Fact Sheets for more species
Utah State University. Cooperative Extension.
See also: Landscape Ornamental Insects for more fact sheets
Utah Weed Control Association.
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Department of Forests, Parks, and Recreation.
As part of the ongoing response to the recent discovery of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) within the state, Vermont has joined the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)'s 31-state quarantine boundary. The quarantine will help reduce the movement of infested ash wood to un-infested regions outside of Vermont's borders. Ash wood may not be moved from Vermont to Maine, Rhode Island, or 7 counties in New Hampshire because the pest has not been identified in these states and counties. Vermont is also developing a series of slow-the-spread recommendations, initially including recommendations for handling logs, firewood, and other ash materials. To learn more about these recommendations, to see a map indicating where EAB is known to occur in Vermont, and to report suspected invasive species like EAB, visit vtinvasives.org
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Environmental Conservation. Watershed Management Division.
Early detection is vital to protecting Vermont's water bodies from harmful invasive plants and animals. With more than 800 lakes and ponds throughout the state, volunteers play a key role in our surveying efforts. Vermont Invasive Patrollers (VIPs) monitor water bodies for new introductions of invasive species and report their findings to the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).

Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Fish & Wildlife Department.

Lake Champlain Basin Program.

Utah State University Extension.
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services.