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Invasive Species Resources

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Oregon Department of Agriculture. Plant Division. Noxious Weed Control.

See also: Oregon Noxious Weed Profiles for more species

University of Nevada - Reno. Cooperative Extension.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

The United States Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has analyzed the potential environmental effects of establishing an integrated management strategy to control cogongrass in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina. The draft environmental assessment is now available for comment. Cogongrass is an invasive exotic grass found on public and private property, along roadways, in forests, and on farmland. This federally regulated noxious weed grows rapidly, reducing forest productivity, harming wildlife habitat and ecosystems, and encroaching on pastures and hayfields. Because of cogongrass' impact on agriculture and forest industries, Congress has given APHIS funding to partner with Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina to control the spread of this weed. APHIS is proposing is an integrated management strategy that uses preventive, cultural, mechanical, biological, and chemical methods to control cogongrass in key areas of its distribution. APHIS invites the public to review and comment on this environmental assessment by April 1, 2020.

Utah Department of Agriculture and Food.

Oregon State University. Extension Service.
This concise publication gives useful information for homeowners, master gardeners, and professional landscapers about the boxwood blight disease: its symptoms, sanitation measures when it is discovered on a property, and preventive measures.
New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food.
Boxwood blight is a disease affecting plants in the family Buxaceae including boxwoods (Buxus), Pachysandra, and Sarcococca plants. First detected in the U.S. in 2011, it has since been found in multiple states and provinces from the East Coast to the West Coast. Boxwood blight has now been confirmed on boxwood nursery stock in New Hampshire. New Hampshire nurseries, landscapers, town officials and residents responsible for boxwood plantings should learn the symptoms associated with boxwood blight. Watch for black lesions on stems, "zonate" brown spots on leaves leading to chlorosis, and leaf drop. If boxwood blight is suspected on recently purchased boxwoods, or plants in proximity to recently purchased boxwoods, please contact the Division and collect a sample for analysis by the UNH Plant Diagnostic Lab.

Mississippi State University. Extension.

University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension.
Mississippi Forestry Commission.
Mississippi's ash trees are living on borrowed time. Every day the emerald ash borer is not detected in Mississippi is a minor victory. Infestations in surrounding Tennessee (detected 2010 near Nashville), Arkansas (detected in 2014 near Hot Springs) and north-central Louisiana (2015) continue to expand, despite quarantines in those areas. Most frighteningly, EAB was confirmed in Calhoun County, Alabama in October 2016. EAB now has Mississippi surrounded, and it is likely only a matter of time before it finds its way here. To prevent the spread of this and other non-native beetles, do not move firewood. Firewood is a vehicle for movement of tree-killing forest pests including EAB and Asian longhorned beetle. See Forest Health Articles for more pest alerts.
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services.
See also: Exotic Species Program - Publications for more resources
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services.
See also: Exotic Species Program - Publications for more resources
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services.
See also: Exotic Species Program - Publications for more resources
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services.
See also: Exotic Species Program - Publications for more resources
New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food. Division of Plant Industry.
See also: New Hampshire's Prohibited Invasive Plant Fact Sheets for additional invasive trees, shrubs, vines, and herbaceous plants
New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food. Division of Plant Industry.
See also: New Hampshire's Prohibited Invasive Plant Fact Sheets for additional invasive trees, shrubs, vines, and herbaceous plants
New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food. Division of Plant Industry.
See also: New Hampshire's Prohibited Invasive Plant Fact Sheets for additional invasive trees, shrubs, vines, and herbaceous plants
New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food. Division of Plant Industry.
See also: New Hampshire's Prohibited Invasive Plant Fact Sheets for additional invasive trees, shrubs, vines, and herbaceous plants