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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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University of Wisconsin. Extension Lakes Program.
The Clean Boats, Clean Waters volunteer watercraft inspection program is an opportunity to take a front line defense against the spread of aquatic invasive species.
University of Wisconsin.

University of Minnesota Extension.

Forest pest first detectors are trained to quickly detect and diagnose early infestations of emerald ash borer, gypsy moth, Asian longhorned beetle, Japanese barberry, Oriental bittersweet and other pests, so that state and federal agencies can control the spread. Become part of the award-winning Minnesota Forest Pest First Detector volunteer program to help the public find new invasive species affecting Minnesota’s trees and forests, or attend as a refresher for those already active as Forest Pest First Detectors.

University of Minnesota. Department of Forest Resources.

Welcome, Volunteers! Pesky Plant Trackers is a citizen science opportunity focused on two non-native plants, wild parsnip and Japanese knotweed. Volunteers use Nature's Notebook to collect important information by observing seasonal changes in leaves, flowers, and fruits.

River Alliance of Wisconsin.

University of Wisconsin-Madison.
The Wisconsin First Detector Network (WIFDN) is a citizen science network that empowers people to take action against invasive species through invasive species monitoring, management, and outreach. WIFDN provides training and resources through a combination of webinars, instructional videos, and hands-on workshops, in addition to providing volunteer opportunities to citizen scientists. Consider becoming a First Detector and help improve our network to minimize the impact and spread of invasive species in Wisconsin.
University of Wyoming; Wyoming Department of Agriculture; USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.