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Invasive Species Resources

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Pennsylvania State University. College of Agricultural Sciences. Entomology.
Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
The Bureau of Animal Health and Diagnostic Services (BAHDS) is responsible for controlling and eradicating diseases in livestock and poultry. This mission is critical since these diseases have the potential to impact human health and cause significant economic loss to farmers and the commonwealth. In addition, BAHDS administers regulatory programs for animal health certification, containment of diseased animals and elimination of disease agents.

New Hampshire Department of Transportation.

To address mounting concerns over invasive plants and the role NHDOT activities play in the spread of these plants along roadsides, Best Management Practices (BMPs) have been developed with input from Maintenance Districts, the Roadside Development Section, the Bureau of Construction, and the NH Department of Agriculture. Implementation of these BMPs will help prevent the spread of invasive plants caused by maintenance and construction activities.

Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
The Bureau of Plant Industry provides services to maintain and protect Pennsylvania agriculture through both consumer protection and product regulation.
New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands.
Portland State University.
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services. Coastal Program.
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.

University of Maryland. Home and Garden Information Center.

Pennsylvania State University. School of Forest Resources.

Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.
Maryland Department of Agriculture.
A Notice of Final Action for the Maryland Invasive Plant Regulations was published in the Maryland Register on Friday, February 3. These regulations went into effect February 13. The updated regulations add a total of four new species to the Tier 1 and Tier 2 lists established by the original invasive plant regulations (April 2016). Weed risk assessments are ongoing, and additional plant species will be added to the lists through the regulatory process as they are completed and approved. These science-based assessments are the foundation for decisions regarding a plant’s invasive status in the state. Full assessment reports are available on the Maryland Invasive Plants Prevention and Control website.
University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension.
New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food.

Oregon Invasive Species Council.

In 2010, Oregon, Washington, and Idaho launched a tri-state outreach campaign to inform the public about the dangers of moving firewood to Pacific Northwest forests. The campaign, funded by the United States Department of Agriculture, closely followed the messaging of the national Don't Move Firewood campaign, which recommends buy firewood that was cut locally, preferably within the county or region of where it will be burned. The tri-state outreach campaign, Buy It Where You Burn It, encouraged good campfire practices with branded posters, billboards, and playing cards located at rest stops and state parks.

USDA. NRCS. Pennsylvania.
Maryland Department of Agriculture.

Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

The emerald ash borer is a half-inch long metallic green beetle with the scientific name Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. Larvae of this beetle feed under the bark of ash trees. Their feeding eventually girdles and kills branches and entire trees. Emerald ash borer was first identified in North America in southeastern Michigan in 2002.

New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services.
See also: Exotic Species Program - Publications for more resources
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services.
See also: Exotic Species Program - Publications for more resources