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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme.

Four new publications have been added to the 'Pacific Invasive Battler Series,' and are now available for free download from the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP), to help Pacific practitioners, environmental managers, government and community members in specific areas of invasive species management.

Developed through the Pacific Regional Invasive Species Management Support Service (PRISMSS), the Battler Series is an important resource for those working to restore ecosystems and manage invasive species. It provides tested best practice approaches through step by step guidance, case studies and visual aid for those battling invasive species. The series provides information and case-studies that can assist those working in the field and is written in a user-friendly way. There are now 15 publications in the Pacific Invasive Battler Series, and they are available for download on the Battler Resource Base.

Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (Institute for Marine and Coastal Research, Colombia).

Special Note: In Spanish

Környezetvédelmi és Vízügyi Minisztérium (Ministry of Environmental Protection and Water Resources, Hungary); National Ecological Network.

Global Invasive Species Programme.

Invasive alien species are more often than not pigeon-holed as an environmental or biodiversity issue, and consequently – especially in developing countries – do not receive due recognition by policy-makers. Yet the reality is that they are a major threat to human livelihoods, especially to agriculture and therefore food security, and are generally undermining human well-being. Moreover, ongoing globalisation and increasing trade are escalating the problem to critical proportions. We hope that this booklet will contribute towards a better understanding of these links and to placing invasive species firmly on the development agenda. See also: GISP Publications and Reports for more resources

Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity.

University of Arizona. Cooperative Extension.
This booklet is the 2nd edition of a similar booklet published in 2001. This edition includes most of the invasive plant species that appeared in the 1st edition and several other species have been added. The booklet is not intended to provide a comprehensive list of all of Arizona’s invasive weeds, but rather, it illustrates a few invasive plants that have become, or have the potential to become, problematic in Arizona.
Publication Number: AZ1482-2016

University of Delaware Cooperative Extension.

Plants for a Livable Delaware is a campaign to identify and promote superior plants that thrive without becoming invasive. Visit the University of Delaware's Extension Program for more information on sustainable landscaping.

Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme.

This guide explains how natural enemies (typically invertebrates and pathogens from the native home range of the pest) can be used to control serious invasive weeds in the Pacific. The use of natural enemies is the most cost-effective method of controlling widespread weeds in the Pacific. It is particularly important in the Pacific context where local capacity to manage such widespread problems is limited. For more knowledge resources, please visit the Pacific Battler Resource Base.

Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme.

This guide explains how natural enemies (typically invertebrates and pathogens from the native home range of the pest) can be used to control serious invasive weeds in the Pacific. The use of natural enemies is the most cost-effective method of controlling widespread weeds in the Pacific. It is particularly important in the Pacific context where local capacity to manage such widespread problems is limited. For more knowledge resources, please visit the Pacific Battler Resource Base.

Utah State University Extension.