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Invasive Species Resources

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Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.

Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission.

See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for more action plans

Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission.
See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for more action plans
North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission.
Scroll to view list of aquatic species banned in Pennsylvania.
North Dakota Game and Fish Department.

New Hampshire Fish and Game Department.

Click on "NH Laws and Rules Related to Aquatic Invasive Wildlife" to view list of prohibited wildlife.
Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.
Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.
Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.
University of Maryland. Cooperative Extension. Home and Garden Information Center.
Have a plant or pest question? Questions from Maryland and the District of Columbia are answered by Home and Garden Information Center’s Certified Professional Horticulturists. If you are located outside of these areas, you will be asked to enter your state and county. Your question will be forwarded to the appropriate extension expert.
eXtension.

eXtension is an educational partnership of more than 70 universities to help you improve your life every day with access to objective, research-based information and educational opportunities. Categories include integrated pest management and fire ants. Requires free registration.
See also: Use the One Search service to search the resources provided by your Cooperative Extension Service using a Google Custom Search Engine that includes many of the Cooperative Extension web sites provided by your Land-Grant institutions.

Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
This Best Management Practice document is a set of guidelines for home growers of landscape boxwood to avoid introduction of the boxwood blight pathogen into a landscape or, if the disease is already present in a landscape, to manage the disease in the most effective manner and avoid spread of the disease to new locations. See also: Resources for Plant Diseases for more publications
New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food.
Boxwood blight is a disease affecting plants in the family Buxaceae including boxwoods (Buxus), Pachysandra, and Sarcococca plants. First detected in the U.S. in 2011, it has since been found in multiple states and provinces from the East Coast to the West Coast. Boxwood blight has now been confirmed on boxwood nursery stock in New Hampshire. New Hampshire nurseries, landscapers, town officials and residents responsible for boxwood plantings should learn the symptoms associated with boxwood blight. Watch for black lesions on stems, "zonate" brown spots on leaves leading to chlorosis, and leaf drop. If boxwood blight is suspected on recently purchased boxwoods, or plants in proximity to recently purchased boxwoods, please contact the Division and collect a sample for analysis by the UNH Plant Diagnostic Lab.
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
Boxwood blight (also called "box blight" in Europe), caused by the fungal pathogen Cylindrocladium pseudonaviculatum (=C. buxicola), was found for the first time in the United States in North Carolina, Virginia and Connecticut in 2011. The first reported infestation in the U.S. was in a North Carolina nursery and the disease was introduced to Virginia on plants from that nursery. Spread outside the two Virginia locations, both of which are fields owned by a single nursery, has not been reported. However, growers should be aware of the symptoms of boxwood blight and monitor nursery and landscape boxwoods for symptoms.
Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.
Pennsylvania State University. College of Agricultural Sciences. Entomology.