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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Sea Grant.
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Sea Grant.
AIS-HACCP is a self-inspection system for reducing the risk of spreading aquatic invasive species through aquaculture, hatchery, scientific, natural resource, and baitfish harvesting activities. This adaptable way to protect waterways from unwanted species was derived from HACCP methods required for the seafood industry and builds on Sea Grant’s success in assisting industry compliance.
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
This Best Management Practice document is a set of guidelines for home growers of landscape boxwood to avoid introduction of the boxwood blight pathogen into a landscape or, if the disease is already present in a landscape, to manage the disease in the most effective manner and avoid spread of the disease to new locations. See also: Resources for Plant Diseases for more publications
Oregon State University. Extension Service.
This concise publication gives useful information for homeowners, master gardeners, and professional landscapers about the boxwood blight disease: its symptoms, sanitation measures when it is discovered on a property, and preventive measures.
Texas A&M University. Entomology.
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
Boxwood blight (also called "box blight" in Europe), caused by the fungal pathogen Cylindrocladium pseudonaviculatum (=C. buxicola), was found for the first time in the United States in North Carolina, Virginia and Connecticut in 2011. The first reported infestation in the U.S. was in a North Carolina nursery and the disease was introduced to Virginia on plants from that nursery. Spread outside the two Virginia locations, both of which are fields owned by a single nursery, has not been reported. However, growers should be aware of the symptoms of boxwood blight and monitor nursery and landscape boxwoods for symptoms.
Portland State University.
Texas A&M University. Texas Forest Service.
See also: Texas Forestry Association's "Dirty Dozen" (scroll to view) for more fact sheets