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Invasive Species Resources

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Arizona Game and Fish Department.
New state regulations to help prevent the spread of quagga mussels and zebra mussels went into effect in Mar 2010. These regulatory measures, known as "Director's Orders," were authorized by the Aquatic Invasive Species Interdiction Act passed by the Arizona Legislature in 2009. The orders contain a list of aquatic invasive species for Arizona, a list of waters where aquatic invasive species are present, and mandatory conditions for the movement of watercraft.
DOI. NPS. Yellowstone National Park.
If you plan to use your own boat or angler float tube, you’ll need a permit and a free Yellowstone aquatic invasive species inspection. You can speed up the inspection process by arriving with a boat that is clean, drained, and dry. Watercraft that arrive dirty or with standing water will be subject to decontamination. Watercraft that cannot be properly decontaminated will be prohibited from launching.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
DOI. NPS. Glacier National Park.
Glacier National Park waters are generally open for boating from mid-May through October. All watercraft require an NPS inspection and permit before launching. Prior cleaning, draining, and drying of all watercraft, both externally and internally, will reduce inspection time significantly.
Oregon Administrative Rules.
Scroll to view: Prohibited Species (635-056-0050)
Indiana Department of Natural Resources.
The Indiana Terrestrial Plant Rule (312 IAC 18-3-25) designates 44 species of plants as invasive pests. This rule makes it illegal to sell, gift, barter, exchange, distribute, transport, or introduce these plants in the State of Indiana. This rule goes into effect in two stages. As of April 18, 2019, it is illegal to introduce plant species on this list not already found in Indiana. Plant species already in trade will be prohibited from sale one year later (April 18, 2020).

Ohio Invasive Plants Council.

In September of 2014, the Ohio General Assembly granted the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) the exclusive authority to regulate invasive plants species. Under the law invasive plants are defined as plant species that are not native to Ohio whose introduction causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm, or harm to human health as determined by scientific studies. After nearly two years of stakeholder outreach, new rules have been established and are effective as of January 7, 2018. 

Montana Department of Agriculture.
See also: Noxious Weeds for more resources
DOI. NPS. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area.
It is crucial to keep the mussels from moving from Lake Powell to other lakes and rivers. Utah and Arizona state laws require you to clean, drain, and dry your boat when leaving Lake Powell using self-decontamination procedures. Additional steps are required if you launch on other waters without a significant drying period or if you are on Lake Powell for more than 5 days.
Oregon Department of Agriculture.
Ohio Administrative Code.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Arizona Department of Agriculture.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Watercraft inspections are required. If you cannot get to an open inspection station you can get your watercraft inspected at a regional or area FWP office (PDF | 503 KB).

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife.

Beginning Jan. 1, 2020, the Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Permit required for non-motorized boats 10 feet and longer will be replaced by a Waterway Access Permit. The AIS Permit will remain for out-of-state motorized boats and is included in Oregon boat registration fees.