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Invasive Species Resources

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Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.

New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands.

As of Jul 2011, New Hampshire has banned the importation of untreated firewood without a commercial or home heating compliance agreement. Firewood is a major source of damaging insects and diseases. This ban will help protect the health on New Hampshire's forests.

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Watercraft inspections are required. If you cannot get to an open inspection station you can get your watercraft inspected at a regional or area FWP office (PDF | 503 KB).
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services.

Missoula County Weed District (Montana).

This curriculum is designed to be a supplemental curriculum for teachers who want to integrate the topic of invasive weeds into their existing courses. This curriculum will provide teachers, educators, and weed professionals with an ecologically-based invasive weed curriculum that assists students in developing awareness, knowledge and skills that will result in responsible land stewardship in the state of Montana.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources.

White-nose syndrome (WNS) is an infectious disease responsible for unprecedented levels of mortality among hibernating bats in North America. WNS was first detected in Indiana in January 2011 during routine winter hibernacula surveys conducted by Division of Fish and Wildlife bat biologists. WNS is widely distributed throughout much of the karst region in south-central Indiana and locally established within most of the state's major concentrations of important bat hibernacula.

Google. YouTube; New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

Google. YouTube; Montana Department of Agriculture.

Google. YouTube; Montana Department of Agriculture.

Google. YouTube; Montana Department of Agriculture.

Google. YouTube; New York Department of Environmental Conservation.