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Invasive Species Resources

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Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Montana Department of Livestock. Animal Health Division.
City of Chicago. Department of Environment.
Illinois Department of Public Health. Environmental Health.
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. Plant Disease Information Office.
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.
Illinois Department of Natural Resources.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.

City and County of Butte-Silver Bow (Montana).

Illinois Department of Agriculture. Bureau of Environmental Programs. Division of Natural Resources.
Native to Asia, the Emerald Ash Borer is an exotic beetle that was unknown in North America until June 2002 when it was discovered as the cause for the decline of many ash trees in southeast Michigan and neighboring Windsor, Ontario, Canada. It has since been found in several states from the east coast spanning across the midwest and in June 2006, we discovered that it had taken up residence in Illinois.
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.
See also: Insect Factsheets for more resources
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. 
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.
See also: Insect Fact Sheets for more resources
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.
See also: Insect Fact Sheets for more resources
Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation.
"Forest Health Highlights" (FHHs) are an annual summary of forest insect and disease conditions in Montana. They summarize key findings from the Montana Forest Insect and Disease Conditions and Program Highlights report along with project updates specific to the Montana DNRC Forest Pest Management program.
Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. Forestry Division.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
As part of the statewide effort to address the risks of invasive mussels, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks plans to create a new bureau to manage the prevention, detection and control of aquatic invasive species within state borders. The Aquatic Invasive Species Bureau will be housed in FWP's Fisheries Division, with plans to be operational beginning in March.
Illinois Department of Agriculture.
Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection.
The Emerald ash borer was first found in Connecticut during the week of July 16, 2012. Since that first find in Prospect, EAB has been found in many other parts of the state, particularly in towns in central and western Connecticut. DEEP, the CT Agricultural Experiment Station, USDA APHIS PPQ and the U.S. Forest Service are working together with local partners to slow the spread of the insect and to take steps to minimize its impact. This will be a long-term effort on the part of all involved.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.