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Invasive Species Resources

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Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation.

Montana Invasive Species Advisory Council.
Prepared by: Creative Resource Strategies, LLC. In 2015, the Council contracted with Creative Resource Strategies, LLC to conduct an assessment and gap analysis of Montana's invasive species programs. This report documents the outcomes of that assessment and analysis, and includes an articulation of key gaps as well as a set of recommendations to refine strategies and approaches, and enhance efficiencies, to address invasive species. It is important to recognize that the information from survey respondents represents a snapshot in time—the 2015 fiscal y ear—for each contributing entity. In addition, the information obtained from survey respondents was, in numerous cases, incomplete, and in some cases, not accurate. Nevertheless, the information obtained is of value to identify gaps and inform a set of recommendations.

Montana Noxious Weed Education Campaign.

Montana Department of Agriculture.
See also: Noxious Weeds for more resources
Montana Weed Control Association.

Google. YouTube; Montana Department of Agriculture.

Montana State University Extension.
Montana State University Extension.

South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks.

The South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks (GFP) Commission recently finalized new aquatic invasive species (AIS) rules and modifications to the existing rules in an effort to target the most likely ways that these species are moved from water body to water body.
Michigan's Invasive Species Program.
If your leisure-time plans include boating or fishing in Michigan, recent changes in Michigan’s Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act (NREPA) may affect you. Beginning March 21, watercraft users in the state are required to take steps to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species. Also, anyone fishing with live or cut bait or practicing catch-and-release fishing will need to take precautions to limit the movement of invasive species and fish diseases.
Michgan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy.
The Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy’s Water Resources Division announces a new grant program to aid in the control or eradication of aquatic invasive plants in Michigan’s inland lakes. This year, approximately $100,000 will be available through the Aquatic Invasive Plant (AIP) Control Grant for the reimbursement of permit fees required for projects to control or eradicate inland lake aquatic invasive plant species using physical, biological or chemical control activities that occur in 2019. The grant handbook and application process are currently being developed. The handbook will contain detailed information on eligibility, instructions for applying for the grant, and items to be included with the grant application. Grant applications will be accepted from June 1 through July 1. The handbook will be made available on the Michigan Aquatic Invasive Plant Control Grant Program webpage on June 1.
DOI. NPS. Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore (Michigan).

Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Fisheries Service.

Northwest Michigan Invasive Species Network.