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Invasive Species Resources

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Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Montana Department of Livestock. Animal Health Division.
Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism.

Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism.

Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism.

Montana State University.
The Center for Invasive Species Management closed in 2015. Archives of relevant materials are available here.
University of Vermont. Entomological Research Laboratory.
Lake Champlain Land Trust.
Montana State University Extension.
DOI. Bureau of Land Management.
DOI. NPS. Yellowstone National Park.
If you plan to use your own boat or angler float tube, you’ll need a permit and a free Yellowstone aquatic invasive species inspection. You can speed up the inspection process by arriving with a boat that is clean, drained, and dry. Watercraft that arrive dirty or with standing water will be subject to decontamination. Watercraft that cannot be properly decontaminated will be prohibited from launching.
Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry.
In May 2010 the last boll weevil was trapped in the state and in March 2012 the boll weevil was declared eradicated from the state of Louisiana. The Eradication Program is now at a maintenance level, funded through grower maintenance inspection fees. Traps are placed and monitored according to an approved trapping protocol. Cotton producers have seen increases in yields along with a reduction in the cost of insect control.
University of Vermont. Forest Pathology.
Louisiana State University. AgCenter Research and Extension.
Citrus canker, a serious disease of citrus, was recently found on trees in East Baton Rouge and Livingston parishes, according to LSU AgCenter plant doctor Raj Singh. Citrus canker is a highly contagious bacterial disease that was first detected around 1914 in Louisiana and declared eradicated by 1940. The disease is known to cause defoliation, premature fruit drop, blemished fruit and tree decline. Severely infected trees ultimately may stop producing fruit. If you believe your citrus trees have citrus canker, contact the U.S. Department of Agriculture at 225-298-5410 or the LDAF Horticulture and Quarantine Division at 225-952-8100
Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Weed Management Publications for more resources
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Kansas State University. Kansas Forest Service.
Kansas State University. Kansas Forest Service.