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Invasive Species Resources

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North Carolina Native Plant Society.
Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food, and Markets.
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
Missouri Department of Agriculture.
North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension.
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant Industry Division. Plant Protection Section.

University of Missouri Extension.

North Carolina State University. Extension.

University of Missouri. Extension.

North Carolina State University. Extension.
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant Industry Division. Plant Protection Section.
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. North Carolina Forest Service.
Thousand cankers disease is a fungal disease of walnuts (Juglans spp.) that is carried from tree to tree by a small bark beetle called the walnut twig beetle (Pityophthorus juglandis). It has killed countless ornamental black walnut trees in the western U.S. and was found for the first time in the eastern U.S. in 2010. The first recorded incident of thousand cankers disease in North Carolina (Haywood County) was confirmed in late fall, 2012. Please report the location and descriptions of potentially positive trees to 1-800-206-9333 or newpest@ncagr.gov.
Missouri Invasive Forest Pest Council.
University of Missouri Extension.
Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is an exotic, invasive, wood-boring insect that infests and kills native North American ash trees, both in forests and landscape plantings. With EAB now in several areas of the Show-Me State - and its ability to hitchhike on firewood - the probability of it spreading to noninfected areas in the state is high.

University of Missouri. Extension.

Although not yet detected here, thousand cankers disease (TCD) is a potentially fatal disease of black walnut, caused by the walnut twig beetle (Pityophthorus juglandis) and an associated fungus (Geosmithia morbida). TCD could easily spread to Missouri from the several eastern and western states where TCD is already present. You can help minimize the chances of spreading TCD by following these steps:
Missouri Department of Conservation.
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Department of Forests, Parks, and Recreation.
As part of the ongoing response to the recent discovery of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) within the state, Vermont has joined the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)'s 31-state quarantine boundary. The quarantine will help reduce the movement of infested ash wood to un-infested regions outside of Vermont's borders. Ash wood may not be moved from Vermont to Maine, Rhode Island, or 7 counties in New Hampshire because the pest has not been identified in these states and counties. Vermont is also developing a series of slow-the-spread recommendations, initially including recommendations for handling logs, firewood, and other ash materials. To learn more about these recommendations, to see a map indicating where EAB is known to occur in Vermont, and to report suspected invasive species like EAB, visit vtinvasives.org
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Environmental Conservation. Watershed Management Division.
Early detection is vital to protecting Vermont's water bodies from harmful invasive plants and animals. With more than 800 lakes and ponds throughout the state, volunteers play a key role in our surveying efforts. Vermont Invasive Patrollers (VIPs) monitor water bodies for new introductions of invasive species and report their findings to the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).

Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Fish & Wildlife Department.