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Invasive Species Resources

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Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.
An affirmation card reminds boaters and nonresident anglers of Minnesota’s aquatic invasive species laws. Watercraft owners and nonresident anglers must read and sign the affirmation during their regular license renewal, then keep it in their possession with their license. The affirmation, enacted by the Minnesota Legislature, is another positive step in the state’s proactive efforts to keep 95% of Minnesota lakes off the infested waters list.
South Dakota Department of Agriculture.
Maryland Department of Agriculture.
A Notice of Final Action for the Maryland Invasive Plant Regulations was published in the Maryland Register on Friday, February 3. These regulations went into effect February 13. The updated regulations add a total of four new species to the Tier 1 and Tier 2 lists established by the original invasive plant regulations (April 2016). Weed risk assessments are ongoing, and additional plant species will be added to the lists through the regulatory process as they are completed and approved. These science-based assessments are the foundation for decisions regarding a plant’s invasive status in the state. Full assessment reports are available on the Maryland Invasive Plants Prevention and Control website.

Maryland Department of Agriculture.

See also: Maryland Invasive Plants Prevention and Control for more information about the Maryland Invasive Plant Regulations

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.
Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

Missouri Department of Agriculture.

South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks.
The South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks (GFP) Commission recently finalized new aquatic invasive species (AIS) rules and modifications to the existing rules in an effort to target the most likely ways that these species are moved from water body to water body.
Maryland Department of Agriculture.
South Dakota Department of Agriculture. Agricultural Services Programs.
South Dakota Administrative Rules.
South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks.
The South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks partners with the South Dakota B.A.S.S. Federation and private car washes to provide a list of boat wash locations that have lit, pull-though bays for easy access. Hot water may not be available at these boat washes. If your vessel has been moored in containment waters for 3 or more days or if AIS are attached, your boat must be decontaminated with hot water.
South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks.
The Local Boat Registry (LBR) was developed by the South Dakota Department of Game, Fish and Parks to assist watercraft operators with compliance of Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) possession and transportation regulations and to help slow the spread of AIS from "containment waters" to other waterbodies.
South Dakota Department of Agriculture.
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency.
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.
The Minnesota Watercraft Inspection Program was created in 1992, in response to legislation proposed by the DNR, Minnesota Lakes Associations, and angling groups. In 2011, legislation aimed at strengthening Minnesota's ability to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species was signed into law.