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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Wisconsin Sea Grant.
College of Menominee Nation Sustainable Development Institute.
Note: EAB impacts on American Indian Communities
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
Mississippi State University. Geosystems Research Institute.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Mississippi State University. Extension.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Mississippi State University.
Mississippi Bug Blues is a project that seeks to educate the people of Mississippi about invasive species of insects that pose a threat to our state, its people, and its resources. The main responsibility of this campaign is to educate. Some species, such as the Emerald Ash Borer, have not been found in Mississippi yet, but are a threat because it has been found in several neighboring states. For other species, like the Red Imported Fire Ant, it is too late to prevent them from finding a way into Mississippi, but informing the public about how to avoid such species and control their population are also important.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin's recently revised aquatic invasive species (AIS) management plan is now final and available for use by the public after receiving approvals from the National Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force. Wisconsin last completed an AIS management plan in 2002. Wisconsin's AIS management plan serves multiple purposes, including maintaining Wisconsin's eligibility for funding and directing the AIS efforts of the DNR and partner groups. The new plan also introduces an invasion pathway management approach that will help Wisconsin systematically limit how invasive species move into and throughout Wisconsin. The plan can be downloaded here (PDF | 3.89 MB).

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.