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Invasive Species Resources

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Oklahoma State University. Entomology & Plant Pathology.
Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry.
Arizona Game and Fish Department.
New state regulations to help prevent the spread of quagga mussels and zebra mussels went into effect in Mar 2010. These regulatory measures, known as "Director's Orders," were authorized by the Aquatic Invasive Species Interdiction Act passed by the Arizona Legislature in 2009. The orders contain a list of aquatic invasive species for Arizona, a list of waters where aquatic invasive species are present, and mandatory conditions for the movement of watercraft.
Arizona Game and Fish Department.
See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for additional risk analyses and related species information
Arizona Game and Fish Department.
The Arizona Invasive Species Advisory Council was created in April 2005 by Governor Napolitano to address the challenges that invasive species pose for the state’s natural areas and wildlife.
University of Arizona; USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service; Arizona Department of Agriculture.
The Arizona Plant Diagnostic Network is designed to link growers and master gardeners with plant experts in your community and with plant scientists at the University of Arizona. These experts are available to answer questions about plant health and help identify new and emerging plant pests and pathogens in Arizona. The goal is to increase public awareness of incoming threats to the plants and produce in our State.

University of Arizona; USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service; Arizona Department of Agriculture.

This list of the most serious biotic pests and pathogens is maintained by the State (Arizona Department of Agriculture) and Federal (USDA) regulatory agents. Their goal is to prevent the introduction and/or spread of these pests/pathogens in our state.

Arizona Department of Agriculture.
Oklahoma State University. Entomology and Plant Pathology.
Utah Department of Natural Resources. Division of Wildlife Resources.
Mississippi Department of Agriculture.

Mississippi State University. Extension.

Utah Department of Agriculture and Food.
Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Oklahoma Forestry Services.
Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Oklahoma Forestry Services.
With the quarantine of ash trees in Arkansas, the threat of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) to millions of Oklahoma ash trees intensifies for southeastern Oklahoma, especially McCurtain and Le Flore counties. As the pest is literally next door, Oklahoma Forestry Services is asking Oklahomans to help prevent the infestation spread and be on the lookout and report any signs that the insect is in the state. Please notify Oklahoma Forestry Services at 405-522-6158 if you see signs of EAB infestation in ash trees. For more information about the Emerald Ash Borer visit www.forestry.ok.gov/tree-pest-alerts.

Utah Department of Natural Resources.