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Invasive Species Resources

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New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team; Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space.
Includes New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team Target & Watch Species along with all Widespread Invasive Species in New Jersey. See also Info Center for more resources.

New Jersey Department of Agriculture.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

The United States Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has analyzed the potential environmental effects of establishing an integrated management strategy to control cogongrass in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina. The draft environmental assessment is now available for comment. Cogongrass is an invasive exotic grass found on public and private property, along roadways, in forests, and on farmland. This federally regulated noxious weed grows rapidly, reducing forest productivity, harming wildlife habitat and ecosystems, and encroaching on pastures and hayfields. Because of cogongrass' impact on agriculture and forest industries, Congress has given APHIS funding to partner with Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina to control the spread of this weed. APHIS is proposing is an integrated management strategy that uses preventive, cultural, mechanical, biological, and chemical methods to control cogongrass in key areas of its distribution. APHIS invites the public to review and comment on this environmental assessment by April 1, 2020.

Utah Department of Agriculture and Food.

Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space; New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team.

If you have a smartphone, the power to protect the natural heritage of New Jersey is at your fingertips! You can use it to help stop the spread of invasive plants, animals and even pathogens that threaten the natural systems and economy of the Garden State.

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.
Ohio Department of Natural Resources.
South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Division of Parks and Forestry.

Rutgers State University of New Jersey. Center for Vector Biology.
Utah Department of Natural Resources. Division of Wildlife Resources.
Ohio State University. College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.
Clemson University Cooperative Extension. Home and Garden Information Center.

Hilton Head Island Municipal Government (South Carolina).

Mississippi Department of Agriculture.
Rutgers State University of New Jersey. New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station.
South Carolina Native Plant Society.
Fig Buttercup (Ficaria verna, formerly Ranunculus ficaria) is an early-blooming perennial with origins in Europe and northern Africa. It is also called Lesser Celandine, and it is sometimes confused with Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris). More recently, its behavior has transitioned or is in the process of transitioning to that of an aggressive invasive species that threatens bottomlands throughout its adopted range. Even after its invasiveness was recognized, many people did not anticipate that it would behave invasively in the South, as it has begun to do. Be a Citizen Scientist— We are asking you to help us scout areas near you where it is likely to be found, so that emerging infestations can be documented, treated and monitored.