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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Mississippi State University. Extension.

See also: Publications - Invasive Plants for more resources

Mississippi State University. Extension.

Mississippi Forestry Commission.

One of the most invasive weeds in the world is beginning to make its way into north Mississippi, announced the Mississippi Forestry Commission (MFC). "Cogongrass was introduced to Mississippi as a new forage crop, however, it is not palatable for livestock, not even goats will eat it," Bozeman said. "It also failed as an erosion control plant because it was too weedy. With no native competition or consumers, cogongrass spread rapidly throughout the Gulf South." There is widespread cogongrass infestation in south Mississippi, but the MFC is starting to see and get reports of the weed moving into the northern part of the state. If left unchecked, cogongrass could become a statewide problem.

Bozeman wants landowners in north Mississippi to be on the lookout for cogongrass on their property and the notify the MFC if they suspect the invasive weed has taken root. "The Mississippi Forestry Commission can offer assistance to landowners in north Mississippi who have cogongrass on their property," said Bozeman. "We can also come out and help landowners determine if what they are seeing is cogongrass or not." For more information and to fill out the program application, visit the Cogongrass Control Program. If you suspect you have cogongrass on your property, call your local MFC forester to come do a site visit.

Utah Department of Agriculture and Food.

Ohio Department of Agriculture.

New Jersey Department of Agriculture.

Utah Department of Natural Resources. 

Mississippi Forestry Commission.

The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is an exotic beetle discovered in the United States in 2002 near Detroit, Mich. Since then, it has spread to 35 states and five Canadian provinces. Mississippi and Florida are the only states east of the Mississippi River that have reported no EAB infestations to date. Originally from Asia, the EAB is believed to have entered the country on infested solid wood packing material or wooden pallets. The MFC will be conducting EAB surveys in multiple counties across the state later this year. The public is encouraged to be on the lookout for EAB signs and report them to the MFC immediately. Click here for more information about the emerald ash borer.

Ohio Department of Natural Resources.

Ohio State University. Extension.

Ohio Department of Natural Resources.

Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Division of Forestry.

Mississippi Forestry Commission.

Utah Department of Natural Resources. Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands.

Mississippi Forestry Commission.