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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Washington Native Plant Society.
Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.

Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission.

See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for more action plans

Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission.
See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for more action plans
Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
Colorado Parks and Wildlife.
Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.
The Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis, "ALB"), a pest of hardwood trees including maple, birch and horse chestnut, was first discovered in Worcester, Massachusetts in 2008. Since their discovery, $50 million in federal and state money has been spent to eradicate the beetle, and 25,000 infested trees in the Worcester area have been cut down in an effort to halt the spread. Use this form to report a possible Asian longhorned beetle sighting in Massachusetts or other states.
Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.
DOI. Bureau of Land Management.
Colorado Parks and Wildlife.
Motorboats and sailboats must have an ANS Stamp prior to launching in Colorado in 2019. Boat owners are required to purchase the ANS Stamp and operators must retain proof of purchase (electronic or printed receipt) on his or her person, the motorboat or sailboat, when operating the vessel (C.R.S. 33-10.5-104.5). ​Funding contributes to prevention and management of ANS in the state. Thank you for protecting our waters and contributing to conservation in Colorado!
Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
The Bureau of Animal Health and Diagnostic Services (BAHDS) is responsible for controlling and eradicating diseases in livestock and poultry. This mission is critical since these diseases have the potential to impact human health and cause significant economic loss to farmers and the commonwealth. In addition, BAHDS administers regulatory programs for animal health certification, containment of diseased animals and elimination of disease agents.
Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
The Bureau of Plant Industry provides services to maintain and protect Pennsylvania agriculture through both consumer protection and product regulation.
Colorado State University. College of Agricultural Sciences.
Colorado Weed Management Association.
University of Connecticut. Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture.

Pennsylvania State University. School of Forest Resources.

Lincoln County Noxious Weed Control Board (Washington).
See also: Weed I.D. and Options for Control for more species

University of Guam.

The University of Guam received another round of funding in September under the U.S. Department of Agriculture Plant Protection Act for the surveying and monitoring of invasive pests of solanaceous crops that are on USDA’s Priority Pest List for 2021. Solanaceae, or nightshades, are a family of flowering plants that include tomato, eggplant, and chili pepper. As part of the national effort this year, UOG was awarded $38,000 to survey and monitor for two pests: Tuta absoluta, which is a moth and type of leafminer capable of destroying an entire crop, and Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2, which is a bacterium, known as a bacterial wilt, that infects through the roots and is deadly to plants.

The work through UOG better prepares the island to manage these invasive species if or when they arrive. "There are certain pathogens and insects that have a reputation of being really bad. These are two of them," said project lead Robert L. Schlub, a researcher and faculty member of UOG Cooperative Extension and Outreach with a doctorate in plant pathology. "They aren’t on Guam, but if they show up, we want to know so we can help get them under control."