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Invasive Species Resources

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South Carolina Native Plant Society.
Fig Buttercup (Ficaria verna, formerly Ranunculus ficaria) is an early-blooming perennial with origins in Europe and northern Africa. It is also called Lesser Celandine, and it is sometimes confused with Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris). More recently, its behavior has transitioned or is in the process of transitioning to that of an aggressive invasive species that threatens bottomlands throughout its adopted range. Even after its invasiveness was recognized, many people did not anticipate that it would behave invasively in the South, as it has begun to do. Be a Citizen Scientist— We are asking you to help us scout areas near you where it is likely to be found, so that emerging infestations can be documented, treated and monitored.
International Potato Center.
South African Institute of International Affairs.
The spread of invasive plant species has serious consequences for Africa. Toxic weeds and harmful shrubs significantly shrink rangelands and lower the productivity of major grain foods such as maize (in some instances by up to 45%). This briefing highlights the significance of earth observation (EO) data for the development of tools and strategies to curb the increasing spread of invasive species.
South Carolina Native Plant Society.
International Rice Research Institute.
SciDevNet.
To tackle devastating crop diseases, Africa should boost regional plant surveillance, writes Mustafa O. Jibrin. Recently, a tomato insect pest, Tuta absoluta, swept across Nigeria, devastating tomato fields and leading to immeasurable financial losses and emotional trauma. T. absoluta originated from the Andean region in South America. The invasive nature of T. absoluta and its resistance to conventional insecticides make it difficult to control. If not handled properly, the effect of this pest could hold the continent's agriculture hostage.