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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Tennessee. Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources.
Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.
See also: Invasive Species Information for more resources
Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources.
The Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources (MDAR) announced today that a single dead specimen of the invasive pest known as spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) was reported and confirmed at a private residence in Boston. As a result, MDAR is urging the public to check for signs of spotted lanternfly adults in any potted plants that they may have received over the holiday season and to report any potential sightings of this pest on MDAR's online reporting form by taking photographs and collecting a specimen if possible. Residents should look for large, gray insects, about one inch long, with black spots and red underwings.
Tahoe Resource Conservation District; Tahoe Regional Planning Agency; DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Watercraft are the largest vectors for spreading aquatic invasive species (AIS), such as quagga and zebra mussels into new waterways, making boat inspections a vital aspect of protecting Lake Tahoe and other nearby water bodies.
Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.

Tennessee Invasive Plant Council.

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.
Arizona State University. Agriculture and Life Sciences.
See also: Citrus Insect Pests for more factsheets
Tennessee Department of Agriculture.
Thousand Cankers Disease (TCD) poses a serious problem to the health of the black walnut tree. Tennessee Department of Agriculture officials urge area residents and visitors to help prevent the spread of TCD:
  • Don't transport firewood, even within Tennessee.
  • Don't buy or move firewood from outside the state.
  • Watch for signs of infestation in your walnut trees.
If you suspect your walnut tree could be infected with TCD, refer to the TCD Symptoms Checklist to alert state plant and forestry officials, or call TDA's Consumer and Industry Services Division at 1-800-628-2631.

Tennessee Invasive Plant Council.

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
The United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed the presence of virulent Newcastle disease in a small flock of pet chickens in Coconino County, Arizona. This is the first case of virulent Newcastle disease in Arizona. This case is believed to be connected to the current outbreak of virulent Newcastle disease in California, as tests show the virus is almost identical to the virus causing disease in California. Virulent Newcastle disease is not a food safety concern. No human cases of Newcastle disease have ever occurred from eating poultry products. In addition to practicing good biosecurity, all bird owners should report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to their veterinarian or to State veterinary officials. Additional information on biosecurity for all poultry flocks can be found at www.aphis.usda.gov/animalhealth/defendtheflock.
Las Vegas Wash Coordination Committee.
Tennessee Bat Working Group.
White-nose Syndrome is a mysterious disease that is killing bats across the northeast United States. Many research projects are underway to help in the fight against WNS, from researching fungicides to modeling the spread and affects of the syndrome. If you would like to help there are many ways in which you can:
  • Report any unusual bat activity (bats flying in the daytime) or unexplained bat deaths to your regional TWRA office. Or check out the Report a Bat Link on this website.
  • Donate to a number of funds collecting money for WNS research (see National Speleological Society and Bat Conservation International pages below).
  • Adhere to state and federal cave closure advisories.
  • Encourage state and federal agencies to assist in WNS research and monitoring activities.
Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.

Google. YouTube; University of Tennessee. Institute of Agriculture.

Google. YouTube; University of Massachusetts - Amherst. 

Google. YouTube; University of Massachusetts - Amherst.

Google. YouTube; University of Massachusetts - Amherst.