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Invasive Species Resources

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Arizona Department of Agriculture.
Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.
The Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis, "ALB"), a pest of hardwood trees including maple, birch and horse chestnut, was first discovered in Worcester, Massachusetts in 2008. Since their discovery, $50 million in federal and state money has been spent to eradicate the beetle, and 25,000 infested trees in the Worcester area have been cut down in an effort to halt the spread. Use this form to report a possible Asian longhorned beetle sighting in Massachusetts or other states.
Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.
Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry.
In May 2010 the last boll weevil was trapped in the state and in March 2012 the boll weevil was declared eradicated from the state of Louisiana. The Eradication Program is now at a maintenance level, funded through grower maintenance inspection fees. Traps are placed and monitored according to an approved trapping protocol. Cotton producers have seen increases in yields along with a reduction in the cost of insect control.
DOI. NPS. Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry. Maine Forest Service.

Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program.
DOI. NPS. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area.
Quagga mussel larvae, or veligers, were first confirmed in Lake Powell in late 2012 after routine water monitoring tests discovered mussel DNA in water samples taken from the vicinity of Antelope Point and the Glen Canyon Dam. As of early 2016, thousands of adult quagga mussels have been found in Lake Powell, attached to canyon walls, the Glen Canyon Dam, boats, and other underwater structures, especially in the southern portions of the lake. It is crucial to keep the mussels from moving from Lake Powell to other lakes and rivers. Utah and Arizona state laws require you to clean, drain, and dry your boat when leaving Lake Powell using self-decontamination procedures.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

University of Arizona. Cooperative Extension.
University of Massachusetts - Amherst. Extension.
Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.
Lake Stewards of Maine.
Special Note: Formerly known as the Maine Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program.
Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry. Maine Forest Service.

Maine Forest Service. Winter moth was first recorded in Nova Scotia in the 1930s and then in the Pacific Northwest in the 1970's. It showed up in eastern Massachusetts in the early 2000's and has since spread into coastal Maine from Kittery to Bar Harbor. Fill out the Winter Moth Survey to help us gather information about the distribution of these moths across Maine. The results will be used to help with biological control development and other research.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

The Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry has announced a formal quarantine on emerald ash borer (EAB) and material that may harbor it. Quarantine Area: The quarantine area includes all of York County and the northeastern corner of Aroostook County. The quarantine boundaries were drawn to include a buffer on those towns where EAB had been detected. EAB was found in northern Aroostook County in May 2018 and in western York County in September 2018. In 2019, EAB was detected in Portland, ME. An emergency order is in place to limit movement of infested ash from parts of Cumberland County. If you suspect emerald ash borer, please report it online, or call: 207-287-3891.